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Got this question in an interview today, and its optimized solution stopped me cold (which blows, because I really wanted to work for this company...)

Given a single array of real values, each of which represents the stock value of a company after an arbitrary period of time, find the best buy price and its corresponding best sell price (buy low, sell high).

To illustrate with an example, let's take the stock ticker of Company Z:

55.39 109.23 48.29 81.59 105.53 94.45 12.24

Important to note is the fact that the array is "sorted" temporally - i.e. as time passes, values are appended to the right end of the array. Thus, our buy value will be (has to be) to the left of our sell value.

(in the above example, the ideal solution is to buy at 48.29 and sell at 105.53)

I came up with the naive solution easily enough with O(n2) complexity (implemented in java):

// returns a 2-element array: first element is the index in the argument array
// of the best buying price, and the second element is the index of the best
// selling price which, collectively, maximize the trading return
//
// if there is no favorable trading (e.g. prices monotonically fall), null is returned
public int[] maximizeReturn(ArrayList<Double> prices) {
  int [] retval = new int[2];
  int BUY = 0, SELL = 1;
  retval[BUY] = retval[SELL] = -1; // indices of buy and sell prices, respectively

  for (int i = 0; i < prices.size(); i++) {
    for (int j = i + 1; j < prices.size(); j++) {
      double difference = prices.get(j).doubleValue() - 
                          prices.get(i).doubleValue();

      if (difference > 0.0) {
        if (retval[BUY] < 0 || difference > prices.get(retval[SELL]).doubleValue() - 
                                            prices.get(retval[BUY]).doubleValue()) {
          retval[BUY] = i;
          retval[SELL] = j;
        }
      }
    }
  }
  return (retval[BUY] > 0 ? retval : null);
}

Here's where I screwed up: there's a linear time O(n) solution, and I completely bombed in trying to figure it out (yeah, I know, FAIL). Does anyone know how to implement the linear time solution? (any language you're comfortable with) Thanks!

Edit

I suppose, for anyone interested, I just received word today that I didn't get the job for which I interviewed where they asked me this question. :(

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1  
I'd like to see some functional implementations of this... strikes me of the sort of thing functional people do nicely in a tricky way... –  robince Nov 3 '09 at 9:28
    
I'd bet you interviewed at Bloomberg, eh? –  Jacob Krall May 16 '10 at 22:29
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16 Answers 16

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's an attempt (C++). Basically everytime I track a new top, I try to see if thats the best profit thusfar. I know that the "bottom" must have been discovered earlier. At that point I remember the top, bottom, and the current max profit. If a new bottom is discovered later, its AFTER the current top, so we must reset top and see if a slightly lower "top" can yield better profit.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{

    double REALLY_BIG_NO = 1e99;
    double bottom = REALLY_BIG_NO; // arbirtrary large number
    double currBestBuy = 0.0;
    double top = 0.0;
    double currBestSell = 0.0;
    double profit = 0.0;

    // array of prices
    double prices[] = {10.50, 55.39, 109.23, 48.29, 81.59, 105.53, 94.45, 12.24, 152.0, 2, 170.0};
    int numPrices = 10;// number of prices

    for (int i = 0; i < numPrices; ++i)
    {
         if (prices[i] < bottom)
         {
            bottom = prices[i];
            // reset the search on a new bottom
            top = 0.0;
         }
         else if (prices[i] > top)
         {
            top = prices[i];
           // calculate profit
            double potentialProfit = (top - bottom);
            if (potentialProfit > profit &&
                bottom != REALLY_BIG_NO)
            {
                profit = potentialProfit;
                currBestSell = top;
                currBestBuy = bottom;
            }
         }
    }

    std::cout << "Best Buy: " << currBestBuy << "Best Sell: " << currBestSell << std::endl;
}

So far I've played around with a bunch of different input sets, and so far I haven't had any problems... (let me know if you test this and see anything wrong)

I highly recommend using Austin Salonen's updated answer to this question and adapting it to your language.

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I was inching close to a solution like this one as I bumbled along; I had five variables set up exactly as you do. Unfortunately I started doing some crazy value swapping and pretty much went off the deep end from there. =/ –  Magsol Nov 2 '09 at 21:09
1  
I rebuilt my algo and it's the same as yours now... Different language and some really good comments so I'll leave it up. –  Austin Salonen Nov 2 '09 at 21:37
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In C#:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    double[] values = new double[7]{55.39, 109.23, 48.29, 81.59, 105.53, 94.45, 12.24};

    double max = double.MinValue, maxDiff = double.MinValue, diff = 0;

    for (int i = 1; i < values.Length; i++)
    {
        if (values[i] > values[i - 1])
        {
            //trending upward, append to existing differential
            diff += values[i] - values[i - 1];
        }
        else
        {
            //trending downward, reset the diff
            diff = 0;
        }

        if (diff > maxDiff)
        {
            maxDiff = diff;
            max = values[i];
        }
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Buy at {0}; Sell at {1}", max - maxDiff, max);
}

EDIT: New algo based on @Joe's failing test case -- Nice Catch BTW! It's also the same answer as @Doug T's now...

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    double[] values = new double[8] { 55.39, 109.23, 48.29, 81.59, 81.58, 105.53, 94.45, 12.24 };

    double max = double.MinValue, maxDiff = double.MinValue, diff = 0;
    double bottom = values[0];

    for (int i = 1; i < values.Length; i++)
    {
        diff += values[i] - values[i - 1];

        if (diff > maxDiff)
        {
            maxDiff = diff;
            max = values[i];
        }

        if (values[i] < bottom)
        {
            bottom = values[i];
            diff = 0;
        }
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Buy at {0}; Sell at {1}", max - maxDiff, max);
}
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1  
+1 for the more elegant answer –  Doug T. Nov 2 '09 at 20:58
    
I suppose there should be a check that max & maxDiff were actually set before displaying them (for a sorted descending list) but we'll be optimistic the stock had at least one good session... –  Austin Salonen Nov 2 '09 at 21:04
    
I really like this; the idea of incrementing the differential hadn't occurred to me. Very elegant! –  Magsol Nov 2 '09 at 21:07
3  
This seems to fail for the input 55.39, 109.23, 48.29, 81.59, 81.58, 105.53, 94.45, 12.24 ? Best is still to buy at 48.29 and sell at 105.53 (57.24 profit), but it says to buy at 55.39 and sell at 109.23 (53.84 profit) –  Joe Nov 2 '09 at 21:14
1  
Yup, small dips confuse this algo. –  Eric H. Nov 2 '09 at 21:22
show 5 more comments
      public void profit(float stock[], int arlen ){
            float buy = stock[0];
            float sell = stock[arlen-1];
            int bi = 0;
            int si = arlen - 1;

            for( int i = 0; i < arlen && bi < si ; i++){

                    if( stock[i] <  buy && i < si){
                            buy = stock[i];
                            bi = i;
                    }
                    if(stock[arlen - i - 1] > sell &&  (arlen - i -1)  > bi){
                            sell = stock[arlen - i - 1];
                            si = arlen - i - 1;
                    }
            }
            System.out.println(buy+" "+sell);
    }
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I really have to point out as an interview question expecting you to solve it as O(n) is borderline absurd. Interview questions are meant to prove you can solve a problem, which you were able to solve it. The fact you solved it in O(N^2) vs O(N) should be irrelevant. If a company would pass over hiring you for not solving this in O(N) that's probably not a company you would have wanted to work at anyway.

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"The fact you solved it in O(N^2) vs O(N) should be irrelevant." - I really hope you are right on this one :) –  Magsol Nov 2 '09 at 22:09
    
well as an interviewer, its often useful to push interviewees. All else being equal, if only 1 position is open, given the choice between the O(n) solver and the O(n^2) solver, I'll take the O(n) solver. That being said, I'm glad when I interview someone these days that knows O(n) from O(n^2) so you'd probably get the job where I work! –  Doug T. Nov 3 '09 at 3:01
    
@Doug, the issue is about solving the problem first. Unless we're talking N into *illions for a modern computer the difference from linear and binomial time should be negligible. This also goes with avoid early optimization, if they asked a question that could be solved with recursion easily is it better to use the elegant method or to spend the time to write it so it can be done in a loop instead of recursively before it's needed? Optimization can always be done later. –  Chris Marisic Nov 3 '09 at 13:24
    
Having been the interviewer, I'd say that posing this question is a great tool: 1) if they can't code even the O(n^2) solution, they're not a programmer. 2) If they've seen the O(n) solution, that just means they've done a lot of reading (it's really an obscure 'AHA' kind of question). 3) If they haven't, then walking through the thought process of trying to find it should be very illuminating. –  Eric H. Nov 3 '09 at 15:55
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I'd like to describe how I approached this problem to make it easier to understand my code:

(1) For each day, if I had to sell my stock on that day, what would be the minimum amount I could have paid to buy it? Essentially, I'm keeping track of minimum price before that day

(2) For each day, if I were to sell on that day, how much am I earning? (Stock price on that day - minimum price)

This shows that I have to keep track of two things: (1) minimum stock price so far (2) best earning so far.

The problem becomes choosing which day to sell. I will sell on the day that will give me the best earning. Here is my Java code:

    public static void findBestDeal(double [] stocks) {
    double minsofar = stocks[0];
    double bestsofar = 0.0;

    for(int i=1; i< stocks.length; i++) {

        // What is the cheapest price to buy it if I'm going to sell it today
        if(stocks[i-1] < minsofar) {
            minsofar = stocks[i-1];
        }

        // How much do I earn if I sell it on ith day?
        double current_deal = stocks[i] - minsofar;

        // Is selling today better?
        if(current_deal > bestsofar) {
            bestsofar = current_deal;
        }
    }

    System.out.println("Found the best deal: " + bestsofar + " (Bought at " + minsofar + " and sold at " + (minsofar+bestsofar) + ")");

}
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Here is my O(n) implementation for this. I am using a change array to calculate the max profit and buy and sell dates. Your comments on this are welcome.

#include<stdafx.h>
#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    //int arr[10] = {15, 3, 5,9,10,1,6,4,7,2};
    int arr[7] = {55.39, 109.23, 48.29, 81.59, 105.53, 94.45, 12.24};
    int change[7];
    int n=7;
    for(int i=1;i<=n;i++)
    {
    change[i] = arr[i]- arr[i-1];
    }
    int i=0,index = 0;
    int sum = 0;
    int maxsum = 0;
    int startpos = 0;
    int endpos = 0;
    while(index < n)
    {
        sum = sum + change[index];
        if(maxsum < sum)
        {
        maxsum = sum; 
        startpos = i;
        endpos = index;

        }
        else if (sum<0) // negative number ,set sum to zero
        {
        sum = 0;
        i=index+1;
        }
        index++;
    }

    printf("max profit is%d %d %d", maxsum , startpos, endpos+1 );
}
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In my effort to learn Go, and also to rake my brain on this one, here is my attempt.

func GetMaxProfit2(prices []float64) (float64, float64) {
    var min, max, pmin, pmax int

    for i, v := range prices {
        if v - prices[min] > prices[max] - prices[min] {
            pmax = max
            max = i
        }
        // Reset the max when min is updated.
        if v < prices[min] {
            pmin = min
            min = i
            pmax = max
            max = i
        }
    }

    // If min is ahead of max, reset the values back    
    if min >= max {
        min = pmin
        max = pmax
    }

    return prices[min], prices[max]
}
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Here is my attempt using Javascript. The script computes the answer in O(N):

//Main Stock Array
var stock = [15, 20, 0, 3, 30, 45, 67, 92, 1, 4, 99];


//Setup initial variable state
var ans = {}, tmp = {}; //These are just for namespacing / syntatic sugar
ans.minVal = stock[0];
ans.minInd = 0;
ans.maxDiff = stock[1] - stock[0];
ans.maxInd = 1;
tmp.minInd = ans.minInd;
tmp.minVal = ans.minVal;

//Basically we iterate throught the array. If we find a new low, we start tracking it. Otherwise we compare the current index against the previously found low
for(i = 1; i <= stock.length-1; i++) {
    if(tmp.minVal > stock[i]) {
        tmp.minVal = stock[i];
        tmp.minInd = i;
    } else {
        ans.diff = stock[i] - stock[tmp.minInd];
        if(ans.diff > ans.maxDiff) { //Looks like we found a new maxDifference. Lets log the indexes
            ans.maxDiff = ans.diff;
            ans.maxInd = i;
            ans.minInd = tmp.minInd;
            ans.minVal = tmp.minVal;
        }
    }
}

document.write('You should buy your stocks on day ' + ans.minInd + ' and sell on day ' + ans.maxInd);
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please do some explaining –  johannes Oct 29 '12 at 21:20
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This is a C solution that actually works:

void bestBuySell() { double prices[] = {10.50, 10.0, 3.0, 194.0, 55.39, 2.0, 109.23, 48.29, 81.59, 105.53, 94.45, 191.0, 200.0, 12.24}; int arrSize = 14; double bestBuy = prices[0], bestSell = prices[1], bestPotentialBuy = prices[0]; double potentialProfit = prices[1] - prices[0];

for(int i = 1; i < (arrSize-1); i++)
{
    if(prices[i] < bestBuy)
        bestPotentialBuy = prices[i];            

    if((prices[i+1] - bestPotentialBuy) > potentialProfit)
    {
        bestBuy = bestPotentialBuy;
        bestSell = prices[i+1];
        potentialProfit = prices[i+1] - bestPotentialBuy;
    }
}

printf( "bestBuy %f bestSell %f\n", bestBuy, bestSell );

}

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1.We cant simply take the least amount among the values as " Best Buy" and the max amount as "Best Sell" because "Sell" has to happen after "Buy".

2.We must not treat the recorded minimum as the "Best Buy" because the subsequent days may have stock values whose difference with the recorded minimum may yield profit which could be less than the "recorded profit".

3.Best Buy and Best Sell is treated as a single variant,because it is the positive difference between these values that makes max profit.

4.Since any recorded minimum in the past is a potential candidate for buying,the max profit condition must always be checked against the recorded minimum and the current day's stock price.So we always have to keep track of recorded minimum,but just the presence of recorded minimum doesn't constitute "Best Buy" because of reason number 2.

Now have the below code which executes in O(n) times will make sense.

public class BestStockBuyAndSell {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    double[] stockPrices = {55.39,109.23,48.29,81.59,105.53,94.45,12.24};
    int [] bestBuySellIndex = maxProfit(stockPrices);

    System.out.println("Best Buy At "+stockPrices[bestBuySellIndex[0]]);
    System.out.println("Best Sell At "+stockPrices[bestBuySellIndex[1]]);

    System.out.println("Max Profit = "+(stockPrices[bestBuySellIndex[1]]-stockPrices[bestBuySellIndex[0]]));

}

public static int[] maxProfit(double[] stockPrices)
{
    int bestBuy=0;
    int bestSell=0;

    int[] bestCombination ={bestBuy,bestSell};
    double recordedMinimum = stockPrices[bestBuy];
    int recordedMinimuIndex = bestBuy;
    double bestProfitSofar = stockPrices[bestSell] - stockPrices[bestBuy];

    for(int i=1;i<stockPrices.length;i++)
    {
        if(stockPrices[i] - recordedMinimum > bestProfitSofar)
        {

            bestProfitSofar = stockPrices[i] - recordedMinimum;
            bestSell = i;
            bestBuy = recordedMinimuIndex;
        }

        if(stockPrices[i] < recordedMinimum)
        {
            recordedMinimuIndex = i;
            recordedMinimum = stockPrices[i];
        }

    }

    bestCombination[0] = bestBuy;
    bestCombination[1] = bestSell;


    return bestCombination;

}

}

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I came up with following algorithm for this problem, seems to work for all inputs. Also, If the Stock value keeps droping, the program would output not to buy this stock:

  public class GetMaxProfit 
  { 

  double minValue = -1, maxValue = -1;
  double maxDiff = 0;

  public void getProfit(double [] inputArray){
    int i=0, j=1;
    double newDiff = 0;
    while(j<inputArray.length){
         newDiff = inputArray[j]-inputArray[i];
         if(newDiff > 0){
             if(newDiff > this.maxDiff){
               this.minValue = inputArray[i];
               this.maxValue = inputArray[j];
               this.maxDiff = newDiff;
             }
        }
        else{
            i = j;
        }
        j++;
    }
 }

 public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    GetMaxProfit obj = new GetMaxProfit();

    obj.getProfit(new double[]{55.39, 19.23, 14.29, 11.59, 10.53, 9.45, 1.24});
    if(obj.minValue != -1 && obj.maxValue != -1){
      System.out.println("Buy Value for the input: "+obj.minValue);
      System.out.println("Sell Value for the input: "+obj.maxValue);
      System.out.println("Best profit for the input: "+obj.maxDiff);
            }
            else
               System.out.println("Do Not Buy This STOCK!!);

 }

}

Is there any catch you could find in this? It's time complexity is O(N)

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The idea is simple. Keep two pointers, lo and hi.
Do a Foor loop

  1. if price is higher than hi, update hi = price, continue
  2. if the price is lower than hi. Then lo and hi is one of possible candidates. Calculate the profit, store it if it's bigger than previous profits and reset lo, hi to price

def getBestProfit(prices):
    lo = hi = profit = 0

for price in prices: if lo == 0 and hi == 0: lo = hi = price if price > hi: hi = price if price < low: tmpProfit = hi - lo if tmpProfit > profit: profit = tmpProfit lo = hi = price return profit

That's it

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Here is my solution, same as @Doug T. except I am also keeping track of the day in an index. Please provide feedback.

 int prices[] = {4,4,5,6,2,5,1,1};
 //int prices[] = {100, 180, 260, 310, 40, 535, 695};

 int currentBestSellPrice=0;
 int currentBestBuyPrice=0;
 int lowindex=0;
 int highindex=0;
 int low=prices[0];
 int high=prices[0];
 int profit=0;
 int templowindex=0;
 for(int i=0; i< prices.length;i++)
 {
     // buy low
     if(prices[i] < low && i+1 < prices.length)
     {
         low = prices[i];  
         templowindex=i;
         high=0;
     }
     // sell high
     else if(prices[i] > high)
     {
         high = prices[i];
         int potentialprofit = (high-low);
         if(potentialprofit > profit)
         {
             profit = potentialprofit;
             currentBestSellPrice = high;
             currentBestBuyPrice = low;
             highindex=i;
             lowindex=templowindex;
         }
     }
 }


 System.out.println("Best Buy Price : "+ currentBestBuyPrice + " on day "+ lowindex);
 System.out.println("Best Sell Price : "+ currentBestSellPrice+ " on day "+ highindex );
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F# solution for those who interested in functional take on this. I wouldn't say though it's that much different.

let start, _, profit = 
    [55.39; 109.23; 48.29; 81.59; 81.58; 105.53; 94.45; 12.24 ]
    |> Seq.fold (fun (start,newStart,profit) i -> 
                    let start = defaultArg start i
                    let newStart = defaultArg newStart i
                    let newProfit = i - newStart
                    if profit < newProfit 
                    then  Some newStart, Some newStart,newProfit
                    else if start > i 
                    then Some start, Some i, profit 
                    else Some start,Some newStart,profit) (None,None, 0.0)
printf "Best buy: %f; Best sell: %f" start.Value (start.Value + profit)

Output:

Best buy: 48.290000; Best sell: 105.530000
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Here is my solution in Ruby:

values = [55.39, 109.23, 48.29, 81.59, 105.53, 94.45, 12.24]

max_diff = 0
diff = 0
min = values[0]
max = 0

values.each_with_index do |value, index = 1|
  # get an array of the previous values before the current one
  lag_values = values[0..index]

  # get the minimum of those previous values
  min_lag_value = lag_values.min

  # difference between current value and minimum of previous ones
  diff = values[index].to_i - min_lag_value.to_i

  # if current difference is > previous max difference, then set new values for min, max_diff, and max
  if diff > max_diff
    max_diff = diff
    min = min_lag_value
    max = values[index]
  end
end

min # => 48.29
max # => 105.3
max_diff # => 57

Cheers

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void getBestTime (int stocks[], int sz, int &buy, int &sell){
int min = 0;
int maxDiff = 0;
buy = sell = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < sz; i++) 
{
    if (stocks[i] < stocks[min])
    {
        min = i;
    }
    int diff = stocks[i] - stocks[min];
    if (diff > maxDiff) 
    {
        buy = min;
        sell = i;
        maxDiff = diff;
    }
}}

Just in case you prefer this answer. I found it in another web, but still. source:http://leetcode.com/2010/11/best-time-to-buy-and-sell-stock.html

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