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A lot of RSS feeds show a limited number of items, meaning that when you load this feed it will load the latest 10 items for example. When using something like Google Reader it will load many more even if they are not in the sites RSS feed when you load it. Is it downloading all of these feeds to a database even when the user is not on the site? How does this work?

If it is downloading the feeds in the background, what is the best and most efficient way to do this? I can imaging that storing this all in a table would get very big and data intensive if done incorrectly.

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closed as not a real question by Jens Erat, TheHippo, john.k.doe, acdcjunior, Jan Turoň May 19 '13 at 21:02

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Is it downloading all of these feeds to a database even when the user is not on the site?

Yes

How does this work?

By not tying the code that fetches the data and populates Google's databases to the code that outputs the HTML et al for the UI.

It could be done with a simple cron job or a dedicated daemon.

If it is downloading the feeds in the background, what is the best and most efficient way to do this? I can imaging that storing this all in a table would get very big and data intensive if done incorrectly.

There are entire books on that subject (which makes it unsuitable for a stackoverflow question).

You probably underestimate the efficiency of standard RMDBS though, you are unlikely to be dealing with data at anywhere near the scale Google is and an RMDBS will probably do just fine for your purposes. If you outgrow it, then you outgrow it and can look at other options (of which there are quite a lot, including sharding and nosql databases), but don't optimise prematurely.

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