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I am trying to get the Alt key to set a shortcut as Shift+Alt+A orCtrl+Alt+A but when the `Shift or Ctrl key is pressed I can't determine whether an Alt key was pressed or not .The following code makes the problem more clear.

    el.onkeydown=function(e){
    //alert(e.keyCode);

    if(e.shiftKey==true){
    document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode("shiftkey"));
    document.body.appendChild(document.createElement("br"));
    }
    else if(e.ctrlKey==true){
    document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode("ctrlkey"));
    document.body.appendChild(document.createElement("br"));
    }
    else if(e.altKey==true){
    document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode("altkey"));
    document.body.appendChild(document.createElement("br"));
    }
    };

When I try to press an Alt key after the ShiftorCtrl key the e.altKey doesn't get the value of true and I get the result as

    shiftkey
    shiftkey
    shiftkey
    shiftkey
    shiftkey
    shiftkey...

Or for Ctrl:

    ctrlkey
    ctrlkey
    ctrlkey
    ctrlkey
    ctrlkey
    ctrlkey
    ctrlkey...
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Design flaw. You're checking if the shiftKey is pressed down. If it isn't, then you check for the others. Let's think of it step by step.

You press the shift key first. Event fires, and your first condition is satisfied. Now, when you press down the alt key, your keydown event is called again, and this time, since you're holding down both shift and alt, the first and third conditions are met. However, the program never gets to the third condition, because it's in an else clause. Which means only your first condition's code is evaluated, and the rest of the conditons are skipped, since the first was true.

Change your design to check for all the keys individually, not with else clauses for each.

Your code would look like this:

el.onkeydown=function(e){
//alert(e.keyCode);

if(e.shiftKey==true){
document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode("shiftkey"));
document.body.appendChild(document.createElement("br"));
}
if(e.ctrlKey==true){
document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode("ctrlkey"));
document.body.appendChild(document.createElement("br"));
}
if(e.altKey==true){
document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode("altkey"));
document.body.appendChild(document.createElement("br"));
}
};

Think of this example to make your flaw clearer:

if(true){
    console.log('First');
}
else if(true){
    console.log('Second');
}

You can see that it doesn't matter whether the second condition is true or not, as long as the first is.

In your case, though, using the && logical operator would make more sense, since you only want to do something when all three keys are held down to create a shortcut. That'd make your code like this:

if(e.shiftKey && e.altKey && e.keyCode === 65){
    console.log('Shortcut active');
}
share|improve this answer

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