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I'm easily getting confused with iterations - Could anyone walk me through exactly what this code does? Friends and family are hashes and the language is Ruby.

friends.each { |x| puts "#{x}" } 
family.each { |x, y| puts "#{x}: #{y}" }
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Are you sure that friends is a Hash and not an Array? –  Mark Reed May 19 '13 at 16:31
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2 Answers

  • A hash {a: => :b, :c => :d} is cast to an array [[:a, :b], [:c, :d]] when each is called.
  • If the block on each takes one variable x, then each element of it is passed, which is [:a, :b] for the first iteration, [:c, :d] for the next.
  • If the block on each takes two variables x and y, then the the each element like [:a, :b] is matched with the variables. For the first iteration, x becomes :a and y becomes :b.
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friends.each { |x| puts "#{x}" } 
family.each { |x, y| puts "#{x}: #{y}" }

The first is basically equivalent to:

x = [friends.keys[0], friends.values[0]]
puts "#{x}"
x = [friends.keys[1], friends.values[1]]
puts "#{x}"
x = [friends.keys[2], friends.values[2]]
puts "#{x}"
# ...
x = [friends.keys[n], friends.values[n]]
puts "#{x}"

The second:

x = family.keys[0]
y = family.values[0]
puts "#{x}: #{y}"
x = family.keys[1]
y = family.values[1]
puts "#{x}: #{y}"
x = family.keys[2]
y = family.values[2]
puts "#{x}: #{y}"
# ...
x = family.keys[n]
y = family.values[n]
puts "#{x}: #{y}"

Any time you have something like { |...| ... } or do |...|; ...; end after a method, you are creating what is called a block. This block is passed to the method, which can yield parameters to the block. Array#each will call the block with each element; Hash#each will pass [key, value].

You could, of course, do something totally different, like so:

def test
  yield('oh my')
  yield('i really')
  yield('like blocks')
end
test { |a| puts a }

Which outputs

oh my
i really
like blocks

If you yield an array to a block, it can be assigned to multiple or a single parameter.

def test
  yield(['oh', 'my'])
  yield(['i', 'really'])
  yield(['like', 'blocks'])
end
test { |a, b| puts "#{a}-#{b}" }

Which outputs

oh-my
i-really
like-blocks

Or, if you only accept a single parameter in the block, it will be passed as an array

test { |a| puts a.inspect }

Outputs

["oh", "my"]
["i", "really"]
["like", "blocks"]

So, say Array#each doesn't exist and you want to create it yourself. You could do something like

class Array
  def each
    i = 0
    while i < length_of_underlying_array
      next_element = get_element(i)
      yield(next_element)
    end
  end
end

Or, Hash#each

class Hash
  def each
    i = 0
    while i < length_of_underlying_hash
      next_key = keys[i]
      next_value = values[i]
      yield([next_key, next_value])
    end
  end
end

Another general tip, since Ruby is open source, you can see exactly how Array#each and Hash#each are implemented in C, which generally matches the plain Ruby code above.

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