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I have an requirement to execute an expression which contains math and conditional statements and a switch statement. What I've tried is this:

20 + 10 + (if (20 > 10){ return 0.2; } else { return 0.1; }) //+ switch case

Now the compiler throws compilation errors for this expression. Why, and how can I fix it so it does work?

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5  
switch is a type of statement - not an expression which can be used as part of another expression. Personally, I'm pleased about that - it would be horrible to read otherwise, I suspect. You can always extract the switch/case into a method though. The if/else part can be done with a conditional expression. –  Jon Skeet May 19 '13 at 16:30
    
You should use correct switch case syntax; also you have missed return 0.1 in the else brackets. Rgds, –  Alex Bell May 19 '13 at 16:31
    
What are you trying to do here? It looks really quite confusing. –  It'sNotALie. May 19 '13 at 16:33

3 Answers 3

You're looking for the '?' operator for the inline 'if/else'.

As for the inline switch statement, I would suggest using a static Dictionary instead;

So your line

20 + 10 +(if(20>10){ return 0.2} else{ 0.1 }) + switch case

Becomes

20 + 10 + (20 > 10 ? 0.2 : 0.1) + _switchDictionary[switchKey]
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The why: if .. else .. is a statement, not an expression.

The way to do it: Use the ? operator:

20+10+(20>10)?0.2:0.1+(case_condtion_1)?case_value_1:((case_condtion_2)?case_value_2:(...))
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1  
Our client does not wish to use a ternary operator. –  Karan May 19 '13 at 16:50
    
Well, if ... else ... is a ternary operation. The difference is syntax only. –  Eugen Rieck May 19 '13 at 16:55
    
@user984369 See my confusing answer if you don't like to use ternary operator. –  Niyoko Yuliawan May 19 '13 at 17:08

If you like to use if you can modify your expression like this:

20 + 10 + ((Func<double>) (() => { if (20 > 10){ return 0.2; } else { return 0.1; }}))();

But, it will really confusing. Better you use ? operator as @Murkaeus said.

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