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The stripped down program below works well for me but when I move the hashVal declaration (in bold) outside the for loop, my program does not run correctly. Any reasons why I need it to be inside the for loop when inserting in the hashmap? I found this while thinking of potential optimizations after I had gotten my quick and sloppy implementation to work. However it now seems the quick and sloppy implementation works but not what I think the should be the optimized version.

public class X
{
   public static void foo()
   {
      Integer x1 = 0;
      HashMap<Integer, BigInteger[]> map = new HashMap<Integer, BigInteger[]>();
      int hashKey;
      /* **BigInteger[] hashVal  = new BigInteger[2];**  <-----Does not run correctly 
      if I keep the hashVal declaration here. (1) */
      for(x1 = 0; x1 <= 1048576; x1++)
      {
        BigInteger bx1 = BigInteger.valueOf(x1.intValue());
        **BigInteger[] hashVal  = new BigInteger[2];** (2)
        BigInteger res;
        /* Do lots and lots of big integer calculations and get a final result in res */
        hashKey = res.hashCode();
        /* Store res and x1 in hashmap */
        hashVal[0] = res;
        hashVal[1] = BigInteger.valueOf(x1.intValue());
        map.put(hashKey, hashVal);
      }
      Integer x0;
      for(x0 = 0; x0 <= 1048576; x0++)
      {
        /* do lots of BigInteger calculations to generate res */ 
        hashKey = res.hashCode();
        **bigNum = map.get(hashKey); <--------------Never returns a match if (1) above is enabled instead of (2) !**
    }
}

}

share|improve this question

...because when hashVal is outside the loop, it only gets created once and therefore inside the loop you continually push the same BigInteger[] into the map. In other words, every item in the map ends up being a reference to the same BigInteger[]. That means whatever values you put in BigInteger[] during the last time through the loop will be what each reference in the map sees.

When you create a new BigInteger[] inside the loop, then each time through the loop hashVal is a reference to a different BigInteger[].

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. So how can I optimize this so that I do not have to create new BigInteger[] in the loop each time? In C I do not have this problem right? – user2399453 May 19 '13 at 18:42
    
@user2399453, you can't. You must create a new BigInteger[] on each pass, otherwise you will be overwriting the previous values. The difference between the Java version and the C/C++ version is in Java your calling function creates the new array on each pass and in the C/C++ version the put function or [] operator copies the array, but the result is similar - one array is created for each pass. – finnw May 19 '13 at 18:50
    
So in Java, I cannot create an array once (using new BigInteger[2]) and keep assigning different values to index 0 and 1 from then on? Is the new operator like malloc? In Java this is ok I suppose because of garbage collection.. – user2399453 May 19 '13 at 22:41
    
@user2399453: We do not see your "C" code so we do not know what you are doing. There is no built-in "hashmap" in C and in both C and C++, ordinary "arrays" cannot be assigned or put into collections. If you are using "vector" in C++, then that would be another story because assigning a vector copies it. – newacct May 20 '13 at 3:08
    
Thanks, actually I am not using C or C++. So is new equivalent to malloc? What I meant was in C I can do this: int a[2]; a[0] =x; a[1] = y; etc repeatedly and it assigns the values correctly. Can I do something equivalent on Java for an array of BigInteger so that I don't have to do a new each time in the loop? Anyways I found some other big optimizations in my code that cut execution time by a factor of 10 so I am actually in good shape. – user2399453 May 20 '13 at 5:20

that's because, (2) is DECLARED and INITIALIZED inside the loop. So, no matter how many iterations go over, hashVal will always contain values from the last iteration. My suggestion would be to declare hashVal outside the loop and use it inside the loop. The new code will look as shown below.

public class X
{
   public static void foo()
   {
      Integer x1 = 0;
      HashMap<Integer, BigInteger[]> map = new HashMap<Integer, BigInteger[]>();
      int hashKey;
      BigInteger[] hashVal  = null; //changed here
      /* if I keep the hashVal declaration here. (1) */
      for(x1 = 0; x1 <= 1048576; x1++)
      {
        BigInteger bx1 = BigInteger.valueOf(x1.intValue());
        hashVal  = new BigInteger[2]; //changed here
        BigInteger res;
        /* Do lots and lots of big integer calculations and get a final result in res */
        hashKey = res.hashCode();
        /* Store res and x1 in hashmap */
        hashVal[0] = res;
        hashVal[1] = BigInteger.valueOf(x1.intValue());
        map.put(hashKey, hashVal);
      }
      Integer x0;
      for(x0 = 0; x0 <= 1048576; x0++)
      {
        /* do lots of BigInteger calculations to generate res */ 
        hashKey = res.hashCode();
       bigNum = map.get(hashKey); 
    }
}

My changes have been commented in the code as 'changed here'. Do let me know if this approach solved your problem.

Thanks, Madhu.

share|improve this answer

What I meant was in C I can do this:

int a[2]; a[0] =x; a[1] = y; 

etc repeatedly and it assigns the values correctly.

The same thing that happens in your Java program also happens in C:

int main()
{
    int numbers[2];
    int* array_of_int_pointers[2];


    for (int i=0; i<2; ++i) {
        numbers[0] = i * 10;
        numbers[1] = i * 20;

        printf("%d : %d \n", numbers[0], numbers[1]);

        array_of_int_pointers[i] = numbers;
    }

    int* first_array = array_of_int_pointers[0];
    int* second_array = array_of_int_pointers[1];

    printf("%d \n", first_array[1] );

    return 0;
}

--output:--
0 : 0 
10 : 20 
20 

Your questions asks why the last line of the output is not 0.

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