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I am new to AngularJS and I am not able to find answer to below problem on internet even after spending hours.

Please feel free to suggest a better way of doing, what I am trying below.

See my AngularJS work in Progress code:

<li ng-repeat="result in getResults()" ng-controller="resultController"> 
 <div class="name_style">
  {{result.name}}
 </div>

  <!--fetch more details for each result and set to $scope.resultDetail-->
 <div class="name_detail_style" ng-bind=getDetails(result.name) ng-controller="resultDetailController">
  {{resultDetail.image}}
  {{resultDetail.description}}
 </div>

</li>    

For brevity I tried to simplify above.

I am trying to render a list of results in two parts:

  1. getResuls() makes a rest service call to get an array of results.

  2. then getDetails(result) makes another service call to get more details of a particular result.

It is running super slow, because AngularJS trying to render both name and its details simultaneously. I want name to render as soon as it is available and render details whenever getDetail() service call get chance to get response back.

I cannot figure out if/how I can use this solution How to load data asynchronously using AngularJS with SpringMVC?

Let me know if you need to see controller side code too.

EDIT Adding example of controller code too. Please excuse any typos in manually re-creating below code.

function resultController($scope, $http) {
    $scope.getResults = function() {

        $http({method: 'GET', url: resultURL=  timeout: maxTime})
            .success(function (data, status, headers, config) {
               console.log(data);
               $sope.result=data;     
            })

            .error(function (data, status, headers, config) {
                if (status == 0) {
                    serviceTimedoutError($scope, data, status, config);
                } else {
                    serviceFailure($scope, data, status, config);
                }
            })
    };

};



function resultDetailController($scope, $http) {
    $scope.getDetails = function(result) {
          resultDetailsURL=resultDetailsUR+"/"+result  
        $http({method: 'GET', url: resultDetailsURL=  timeout: maxTime})
            .success(function (data, status, headers, config) {
               console.log(data);
           $sope.resultDetails={"image":data["image"],"description":data["description"]};     
            })

            .error(function (data, status, headers, config) {
                if (status == 0) {
                    serviceTimedoutError($scope, data, status, config);
                } else {
                    serviceFailure($scope, data, status, config);
                }
            })
    };

};
share|improve this question
    
You are setting the model directly to the function call, which is not typical. (I have not seen this before). Most of the time you see ng-repeat = "result in results" where results is actually defined in a controller such as $scope.results = getResults();. However, you should post some controller code or factory/service code as well so you can get a complete answer. –  rGil May 19 '13 at 18:51
    
Ok, going to post controller code too. –  Watt May 19 '13 at 18:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't (meaning really shouldn't) reference what is essentially an AJAX call wrapper function in a template. Nevermind that it isn't the "angular way" (templates shouldn't mess with the data, and your ng-repeat is what is calling the ajax function), it breaks because you are making an AJAX call (and one more for each element in the returned array!) for each render cycle!

You should be able to (and most likely will want to) control WHEN you want to get the information from your backend/API, and woork with it until you want to refresh it/commit any changes. So, the main thing to do is change:

<li ng-repeat="result in getResults()" ng-controller="resultController"> 

to

<li ng-repeat="result in myResults" ng-controller="resultController"> 

and resultController to:

function resultController($scope, $http) {
    $scope.getResults = function() {

        $http({method: 'GET', url: resultURL=  timeout: maxTime})
            .success(function (data, status, headers, config) {
               console.log(data);
               $sope.result=data;     
            })

            .error(function (data, status, headers, config) {
                if (status == 0) {
                    serviceTimedoutError($scope, data, status, config);
                } else {
                    serviceFailure($scope, data, status, config);
                }
            })
    };

    $scope.myResults = $scope.getResults();

};

What this does is call the AJAX request once, when the controller is instantiated.

You could then do the same for resultDetailController, but consider if it is worth it. you should separate those calls only if the main results aren't likely to change a whole lot (every time they change, the requests are repeated), or the details represent a lot of data, and you really need to show the structure quickly, and only then, the details.

Also, consider only calling for an element's details when, for instance, the user "opens it".

EDIT, response to comments below

As I said, you should really separate the information (the model, and the AJAX requests to get it and update it) from the templating and displaying. That said, you need to decide what is best:

  • You can get all info upfront, and filter afterwards (filter only what is displayed) or
  • You can get a filtered set of elements from the backend

In the second case, you should still controll how often the AJAX calls happen. You could, for instance, watch the filter variables ( using $scope.$watch() ) and call the $http service when that happens:

(in resultController:)

$scope.$watch("filterString", function(){
  $scope.myResults = $scope.getResults($scope.filterString);
}

I'd note that every time you type something in your filter "searchbox", a new request is made (which can be overkill and even lead to erroneous results - in the case that the request for "beac" returns after the request for "beach", for instance). One possible solution is to implement a timeout that overrides the previous, as you type (the search only kicks in .5 seconds after you stop typing)

$scope.$watch("filterString", function(){
  $scope.getResultsTimeout.cancel();
  $scope.getResultsTimeout = $timeout(
    function(){
      $scope.myResults = $scope.getResults($scope.filterString);
    },
    500);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried to minify the code example in question, actually, getResults() in my project also has some filtering based on user input, and it needs to be refreshed every time to honor user's filtering param. –  Watt May 20 '13 at 12:57
    
The issue remains - you need to be able to tell angular when you want to refresh (you really don't want to do 30+ requests per second!) I will edit my answer to include an example. –  Tiago Roldão May 20 '13 at 13:27
    
Thanks for edit and answer. Just to clarify, I think getResuls will be called only once when page loads, but, getDetails(result) will be called 30+ times, which is my main problem I asked and want to avoid it. In my case ''getDetails'' is slowest of all service because of all the computation it needs to do in backend. And, I still required to show details to user for each result on screen, because without that result are irrelevant. –  Watt May 20 '13 at 14:09
    
It would seem that you would benefit from backend optimization (record results as cache information, etc..) but it is only a feeling and out of the scope of your question. Your initial code is wrong because it results in the same request being made many times, and my answer seems to resolve that. Beyond that, it is a matter of strategy and planning (animation to account for the delay? prioritizing most important requests? pagination?) –  Tiago Roldão May 20 '13 at 16:55
    
+1 for timeout feature and other code explanation. –  Watt May 21 '13 at 19:45

I've create a a plunk at http://plnkr.co/edit/nTI58uAkUfE3pw2yjy9q that shows how to use a service and a directive to a achieve the result you talk about. The keys are that it's at directive link time that the id is associated to the directive. Then the $watch on the detailId is being used to trigger the secondary call.

To use this for your full project you'll have to update the service to use a $http or $resource call to get the content from your server.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 For code and explanation. Though, not sure if it solves my problem ,also I don't know how to use directive in my existing code. –  Watt May 19 '13 at 22:58
    
Is it possible to send an array of 10 result.ids altogether to getDetails(). Because getDetails()'s service can accept multiple resultids in comma separated format. That way, getDetails won't be called for each result, and performance will be in acceptable range. My item list range is 10-30 resuls. So in worst-case scenario getDetails will be triggered only 3 times, instead of 30 times. –  Watt May 19 '13 at 23:00
    
In that case I would send the list to a function like get details, however I wouldn't let getDetails do the work instead I would have a $resource query get the set and still have a different get detail function that pulled from an in memory variable (still from the service) for each detail. –  paullryan May 20 '13 at 4:18
    
You don't necessarily need the directive, however you do need the service plus the watch in the controller to do the late bound callback. –  paullryan May 20 '13 at 4:19
    
Oh and as far as how to use directives, think of them as just wrapper blocks to contain parts of functionality that you do repeatedly. They are there to create a more semantic way of creating code. As Misko Henvry puts it angular teaches the browser new tricks. It does this but allowing you to create isolated code blocks (directives) that can act on and create new syntax for your application. –  paullryan May 20 '13 at 4:22

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