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I can't get the radio button validation to work correctly. The check boxes and textf ield are fine, but the radio buttons are not validation as checked, so the page is not continuing on to the success page.

<script>
        window.onload =function()
        {
            document.getElementById("pie_form").onsubmit = validateForm;
        }

        function validateForm()
        {
            var validName = validateTextBox("pie_name", "error_pie_name");
            var validFlavor = validateFlavor("flavor", "error_flavor");
            var validIceCream = validateCheckBox("ice_cream", "error_ice_cream");

            //if all fields validate go to next page
            return validName && validFlavor && validIceCream;
        }

        function validateTextBox(fieldId, errorId)
        {
            var text = document.getElementById(fieldId).value;
            var errorSpan = document.getElementById(errorId);

            if(text == "")
            {
                errorSpan.innerHTML = "* blank";
                return false;   //stay on this page
            }
            else
            {
                errorSpan.innerHTML = "";   //clear the error
                return true;    //go to success page
            }
        }


        function validateFlavor()
        {
            var flavor = document.getElementById("pie_form").flavor;
            var errorSpan = document.getElementById("error_flavor");
            errorSpan.innerHTML = "";

            if(!flavor.checked)
            {
                errorSpan.innerHTML = "* You must pick a flavor.";
                return false;
            }

            return true;
        }

        function validateCheckBox(fieldId, errorId)
        {
            var checkbox = document.getElementById(fieldId);
            var errorSpan = document.getElementById(errorId);
            errorSpan.innerHTML = "";

            //if you didn't check the checkbox show error
            if(!checkbox.checked)
            {
                errorSpan.innerHTML = "* You didn't agree to have Ice Cream?";
                return false;
            }

            //if you checked return true to say its valid
            return true;
        }

    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <h1>Pie Festival!</h1>

    <form id="pie_form" action="pie_success.html">
        <p>
            <label>Pie Name:
                <input type="text" id="pie_name" name="pie_name">
            </label>
            <span id="error_pie_name" class="error"></span>
        </p>            
        <p>
            Flavor:
            <span id="error_flavor" class="error"></span><br>
            <label><input type="radio" name="flavor" value="apple">Apple</label><br>
            <label><input type="radio" name="flavor" value="blueberry">Blueberry</label><br>
            <label><input type="radio" name="flavor" value="cherry">Cherry</label><br>
        </p>
        <p>
            <label>
                <input type="checkbox" id="ice_cream" name="ice_cream">
                Do you want Ice Cream?
            </label>
            <span id="error_ice_cream" class="error"></span>
        </p>

        <input type="submit" name="continue" value="Continue">
    </form>
share|improve this question
1  
A radio button group is a list of elements. You have to look through the list and see if one of the individual elements is checked. –  Pointy May 19 '13 at 21:52
    
also validation on radio boxes is kinda nonsense as there's always a checked one –  Onheiron May 19 '13 at 22:00
    
@Onheiron—no, there isn't, though it's a good idea to always have one selected by default. –  RobG May 19 '13 at 22:07
    
I disagree that it's always a good idea to have one selected by default. It completely depends on the circumstances. –  Derek Henderson May 19 '13 at 22:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

document.getElementById("pie_form").flavor returns an array. You need to create a variable like isChecked set to false, loop through the array, and set your variable to true if one of the radio buttons is checked. Then continue with your script as written.

This code works:

function validateFlavor() {
    var flavor = document.getElementById("pie_form").flavor,
        errorSpan = document.getElementById("error_flavor"),
        isChecked = false,
        i;

    errorSpan.innerHTML = "";

    for (i = 0; i < flavor.length; i += 1) {
        if (flavor[i].checked) {
            isChecked = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (!isChecked) {
        errorSpan.innerHTML = "* You must pick a flavor.";
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

And here's a fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you stop reading after document.getElementById(...)? After he selected the element by id, he then further specifies .flavor. Since there are three elements with the name 'flavor', an array of three elements is returned. I agree that using getElementsByName() makes more sense, but I opted not to change the method the OP was using in his code. –  Derek Henderson May 19 '13 at 22:33
    
Thank you, I knew it was something simple I was missing. Also I'm a girl. –  Sage K May 19 '13 at 23:01

I suggest you to try use some jQuery and use the :checked selector like this:

$('form').submit(function(e){

    e.preventDefault()

    if($('input[name=flavor]:checked').size() < 1){

        ... do ya thing...

    }else{

        $(this).submit()

    }

you should really use jQuery as it is clean an pretty and easier to debug.

HERE THE WORKING FIDDLE

Edit

The selector :checked is basically a CSS selector thus can be used to select the checked element by jQuery selector. You can learn more about :checked selector here

share|improve this answer
    
Why use jQuery here? Why add all that overhead when all that the OP needs to do is create a marker and loop through an array. Unless there is sufficient reason to use jQuery, I wouldn't just for this particular issue. It's a bit overkill. –  Derek Henderson May 19 '13 at 22:28
    
it's not an overkill, it's adopting an up to date feature which greatly improves code cleaness, readbility and gives a simple and less verbose way to access specific DOM elements by using natural CSS selectors. As for the overhead it doesn't seem such an issue to me, not like a bunch of KB will stall a page loading, as for the code there's only a <script> tag to add in the head. I'd definitely go for jQuery, but this is OP's choice. Also as I said before, radio boxes are supposed to be choice inputs and there should always be a defoult selected one. –  Onheiron May 19 '13 at 23:02

You didn't give any IDs to the radio elements so you can't use getelementbyid and also radio group gives a list so you must loop through thus revised validateflavor function below works:

function validateFlavor(fieldName, errorId) {
    var errorSpan = document.getElementById(errorId);
    errorSpan.innerHTML = "";
    var flavorgroups = document.getElementsByName(fieldName)

            for (var i = 0; i < flavorgroups.length; i++) {
                if (flavorgroups[i].checked) {
                return true; // checked
            }
            };

            // not checked, show error
            errorSpan.innerHTML = '* You must pick a flavor.';
            return false;
        }
share|improve this answer

It is a good idea to always have one radio button checked by default, however sometimes that doesn't suit. You can reference the form controls as properties of the form, so form.flavor will return an HTMLCollection of the controls with a name of flavour. You can then loop over them to see if one is checked, e.g.

function validate(formId) {
  var form = document.getElementById(formId);
  var radios = form.flavor;
  var oneChecked = false;

  for (var i=0, iLen=radios.length; i<iLen && !oneChecked; i++) {
    oneChecked = radios[i].checked
  }

  return oneChecked;
}
share|improve this answer

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