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With getIndex xs y I want the index of the first sublist in xs whose length is greater than y.

The output is:

[[],[4],[4,3],[3,5,3],[3,5,5,6,1]]
aufgabe6: <<loop>>

why getIndex does not work?

import Data.List

-- Die Sortierfunktion --
myCompare a b
    | length a < length b = LT
    | otherwise = GT

sortList :: [[a]] -> [[a]]
sortList x = sortBy myCompare x

-- Die Indexfunktion --
getIndex :: [[a]] -> Int -> Int
getIndex [] y = 0
getIndex (x:xs) y
    | length x <= y = 1 + getIndex xs y
    | otherwise = 0
    where (x:xs) = sortList (x:xs)

main = do
    print (sortList [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]])
    print (getIndex [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]] 2)
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what did you expect? –  Janus Troelsen May 20 '13 at 0:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Getting it to terminate

The problem is in this case

getIndex (x:xs) y
    | length x <= y = 1 + getIndex xs y
    | otherwise = 0
    where (x:xs) = sortList (x:xs)

You're confusing which (x:xs) is which. You should instead do

getIndex zs y
    | length x <= y = 1 + getIndex xs y
    | otherwise = 0
    where (x:xs) = sortList zs

giving

Main> main
[[],[4],[4,3],[3,5,3],[3,5,5,6,1]]
3
*Main> getIndex [[],[2],[4,5]] 1
2
*Main> getIndex [[],[2],[4,5]] 5
3

This gives you the number of the first list of length at least y in the sorted list, which actually answers the question "How many lists are of length at most y in the original?"

How can we find out other facts?

If you want position from the original list, you can tag the entries with their position, using zip:

*Main> zip [1..] [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]]
[(1,[4]),(2,[3,5,3]),(3,[4,3]),(4,[3,5,5,6,1]),(5,[])]

Let's make a utility function for working with those:

hasLength likeThis (_,xs) = likeThis (length xs)

We can use it like this:

*Main> hasLength (==4) (1,[1,2,3,4])
True
*Main> filter (hasLength (>=2)) (zip [1..] ["","yo","hi there","?"])
[(2,"yo"),(3,"hi there")]

Which means it's now easy to write a function that gives you the index of the first list of length longer than y:

whichIsLongerThan xss y = 
    case filter (hasLength (>y)) (zip [1..] xss) of
         [] -> error "nothing long enough" -- change this to 0 or (length xss + 1) if you prefer
         (x:xs) -> fst x

This gives us

*Main> whichIsLongerThan [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]] 2
2
*Main> whichIsLongerThan [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]] 3
4
*Main> whichIsLongerThan [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]] 0
1

Shorter?

but we can do similar tricks:

whichIsShorterThan xss y = 
    case filter (hasLength (<y)) (zip [1..] xss) of
         [] -> error "nothing short enough" -- change this to 0 or (length xss + 1) if you prefer
         (x:xs) -> fst x

so you get

*Main> whichIsShorterThan [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]] 2
1
*Main> whichIsShorterThan [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]] 1
5
*Main> whichIsShorterThan [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]] 0
*** Exception: nothing short enough

Generalised

Let's pull out the common theme there:

whichLength :: (Int -> Bool) -> [[a]] -> Int
whichLength likeThis xss = 
    case filter (hasLength likeThis) (zip [1..] xss) of
         [] -> error "nothing found" -- change this to 0 or (length xss + 1) if you prefer
         (x:xs) -> fst x

so we can do

*Main> whichLength (==5) [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]] 
4
*Main> whichLength (>2) [[4],[3,5,3],[4,3],[3,5,5,6,1],[]] 
2
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Yep that fixed it. Thanks!!! :) –  XHotSniperX May 20 '13 at 0:52
2  
Very nice and thorough answer. I appreciate knowing the thought process not just the solution. –  John F. Miller May 20 '13 at 19:37

Do you mean index of the firs sublist with length > y? If that's not the goal (and < y is), then

length x <= y = 1 + getIndex xs y

should be

length x >= y = 1 + getIndex xs y

Also, (x:xs) = sortList (x:xs) is bottom, since it will never end. If you want to sort it somehow, you might follow AndrewC's solution.

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Ah yep you're right I meant > y. :) I've corrected it –  XHotSniperX May 20 '13 at 0:49

let (and where) bindings in Haskell are recursive: LHS and RHS both belong (and thus refer to) to the same new scope. Your code is equivalent to

........
getIndex (x:xs) y = 
  let                  -- new, extended scope, containing definitions for 
      (x:xs) = a       --   new variables x, xs, a ... the original vars x, xs
      a = sortList a   --   are inaccessible, __shadowed__ by new definitions
  in                   -- evaluated inside the new, extended scope
    if length x <= y         -- x refers to the new definition
      then 1 + getIndex xs y
      else 0

When the value of x is demanded by length, its new definition (x:xs) = a demands the value of a, which is directly defined in terms of itself, a = sortList a:

a = sortList a
  = sortList (sortList a)
  = sortList (sortList (sortList a))
  = sortList (sortList (sortList (sortList a)))
  = ....

A black hole.

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