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We have a service that does the following basic workflow:

1) Starts, reads config settings and performs some calculations in a large loop.

2) Each iteration of the loop, it needs to be able to check if the service has been told to stop. It performs database fetches, calculations then stores results. I am not confident on how well the code is done wrt SQL transactions so at this stage, happy to assume we are only checking for service stop at the start of each iteration.

3) After performing all iterations, the service "sleeps" for a period of time. Could be 5 minutes. Could be 12 hours. It needs to be able to "stop" in this sleep period!

Currently this is performed by the following:

private int threadSleepMinutes = 60;

private readonly Mutex mutTerminateService = new Mutex(false);

private Thread serviceThread;

private Thread serviceStopThread;

// Use this flag to allow the Start op to wait for serviceStopThread
// to get going before continuing to create the main loop thread
private volatile bool stopService = true;

public void Start()
{
    this.serviceStopThread = new Thread(this.RunServiceStopThread);
    this.serviceStopThread.IsBackground = true;
    this.serviceStopThread.Start();

    while (stopService)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(100);
    }

    // Some things renamed to anonymise... you get the idea!
    this.serviceThread = new Thread(this.BigLoopMethod);
    this.serviceThread.IsBackground = true;
    this.serviceThread.Start();
}

public void Stop()
{
    // Release the mutex to terminate the service
    serviceStopThread.Resume();

    // Wait 5s max
    int timeout = 5000;
    while (this.serviceThread.IsAlive && timeout > 0)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(100);
        timeout -= 100;
    }
}

private void RunServiceStopThread()
{
    // To guarantee the same thread takes the mutex
    // and releases it in dot net 4, do both ops in this single thread!
    // Dot net 4 the Start() and Stop() are now usually on different threads.
    mutTerminateService.WaitOne();
    stopService = false;

    // Suspend ourself
    serviceStopThread.Suspend();

    // Release the mutex
    mutTerminateService.ReleaseMutex();
}

public void BigLoopMethod()
{
    try
    {
      do
      {
          bool moreOperationsToGo = true; // Just dummy flags and 'stuff' methods here
          while (moreOperationsToGo && !mutTerminateService.WaitOne(0))
          {
              DoStuff();
          }

          // Using this mutex here to sleep nicely - event driven.
          // Gracefully continues after timeout and gracefully exits if 
          // triggered by the mutex.
      }
      while (!mutTerminateService.WaitOne(this.threadSleepMinutes * 60000));
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Exception handling & logging here
    }
}

Now I get messages saying Suspend and Resume are deprecated. In my situation, I know exactly what code the suspend was run on since the call itself is what suspended it! Resume, I know exactly what it is going to do. The only reason this was even done in the first place was because the mutex worked fine in Start() and Stop() in dot net 3.5 but dot net 4.0 changed so that Start() and Stop() were in different threads AND they marked the workaround as obsolete!

Is there a nice way, non-obsolete way of doing this?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Now you see why it's recommended that Thread.Suspend and Thread.Resume not be used. –  Jonathon Reinhart May 20 '13 at 2:17
    
Hi Jon. I'm not sure what you mean? Apart from them being marked obsolete, they seem to serve the purpose here that mutexes in the Start() and Stop() calls could not? –  Shiv May 20 '13 at 3:16
    
Seems like you could solve this problem pretty easily by replacing the Mutex with a ManualResetEvent. Or, since you're using .NET 4.0, just use a CancellationToken as suggested in the answer below. –  Jim Mischel May 20 '13 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unless you are using mutex for inter-process communication, i.e. cancelling your worker thread from another process - I believe there is an easier way to implement a worker thread with cancellation in .net 4.0. You can use a cancellation token, and wait with timeout on it - it will signal if token was cancelled. Complete solution (partially using your code) below:

using System;
using System.Threading;

class App
{
  static void Main()
  {
    var t = new Test();
    t.Start();
    Thread.Sleep(10000);
    Console.WriteLine("aborting");
    t.Stop();
  }
}

class Test
{
private int threadSleepMinutes = 60;

private Thread serviceThread;

private CancellationTokenSource tokenSource;

public void Start()
{
    // Some things renamed to anonymise... you get the idea!
    this.tokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
    this.serviceThread = new Thread(this.BigLoopMethod);
    this.serviceThread.IsBackground = true;
    this.serviceThread.Start();
}

public void Stop()
{
    tokenSource.Cancel();

    // Wait 5s max
    int timeout = 5000;
    if (!serviceThread.Join(timeout))
    {
      serviceThread.Abort();
    }
}

public void BigLoopMethod()
{
    try
    {
      var token = tokenSource.Token;
      do
      {
          int operationsToGo = 4; // Just dummy flags and 'stuff' methods here
          while (operationsToGo > 0 && !token.IsCancellationRequested)
          {
              Console.WriteLine("work");
              Thread.Sleep(1000);//DoStuff();
              operationsToGo--;
          }
          Console.WriteLine("no more work");
      }
      while (!token.WaitHandle.WaitOne(this.threadSleepMinutes * 60000));
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Exception handling & logging here
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ugh I can't upvote the cancellation token idea (rep still low) so here is a manual upvote! –  Shiv May 21 '13 at 1:54
    
Implemented and works nicely thanks. –  Shiv May 22 '13 at 4:41

You don't need a "stop" thread. The fact that the start method triggers the BigLoopMethod will be sufficient. All you need in stop is to signal the mutex and then join the thread (Thread.Join() will wait for the thread to halt) with an appropriate timeout. I would recommend for robustness to thread abort if your thread doesn't join within an appropriate time to forcibly kill the service.

So in psuedo code:

void Start() 
{
    OpenMutex();
    TakeMutex();
    KickOffMyThread();
}

void Stop();
{
    SignalMutex();
    if (!MyThread.Join(Timeout))
    {
        MyThread.Abort();
        Environment.Exit(1); // Die as thread won't join
    }
}

void MyThread()
{
    while (!TakeMutex(sleeptime)
    {
        DoLongWork();
    }
    //Thread was signalled, exiting.
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is precisely that SignalMutex() in Stop() fails due to the thread that Stop() operates on did not take the mutex so I do not think this solution works in dot net 4.0. –  Shiv May 20 '13 at 3:12
    
I should add, your solution was essentially the original code in the dot net 3.5 version before this workaround was done when we migrated to dot net 4. –  Shiv May 20 '13 at 3:21
    
From memory, the Stop() call receives an ApplicationException indicating the thread does not own the mutex. –  Shiv May 20 '13 at 3:27
    
You could use a ManualResetEvent class? –  Spence May 20 '13 at 4:29
    
That does look promising - thanks! –  Shiv May 20 '13 at 5:11

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