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I have an array of length 10 filled with numbers 0-9.

The numbers are (for the most part) in sequential order. However the number at the starting index can be any number, and whether the numbers are in ascending or descending order is unknown (the numbers wrap around once they hit the min/max number - 0 once it reaches 9, and vice-versa).

Exactly one of these numbers are not in order (as if it's been plucked out and randomly inserted back into the array).

Example:

[4, 3, 1, 0, 9, 8, 7, 2, 6, 5]

The number 2 at index 7 is out of order. The "gap" in numbers between indexes 1 and 2 is okay, and neither the number 3 or 1 is considered out of order.

What's the best way to pinpoint the index of the out-of-order number?

More examples - out of place numbers are marked with *:

[2, 3, *0, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1]
[5, 6, 7, 9, *8, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
[7, 6, 5, 4, 3, *8, 2, 1, 0, 9]
[0, *5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[4, 3, *0, 2, 1, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5] 
share|improve this question
    
you will just need to loop through the array and use a variable to memorize the last number. If the difference of last number & current number is not 1, it is out of order – Raptor May 20 '13 at 2:58
3  
this sounds like a fun job interview question :-) – Michael Dautermann May 20 '13 at 2:58
    
Sounds like you want to find two different things. one is the "out-of-order" item but the other is the "wrap around" (which might, otherwise, be mistaken for an out of order item). So scan through the list recording signs of differences (seq[n-1] - seq[n] > 0) and looking for any case where you see two consecutive sign changes. A naive implementation could be tricked by degenerate inputs but otherwise you'll find your "culprit" in linear time. An array with no errors would be all -, -, - ... with, at most, one change go +, +, + ... but the telltale is: -, -, -, +, -, +, ... (or vice versa). – Jim Dennis May 20 '13 at 6:48
    
Question: You said the numbers wrap around once they hit the maximum or minimum value. But you also said that the numbers may have a 1+ gap between them. So can the numbers wrap around even if they haven't hit the maximum or minimum value? Is the following series valid - [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 0, 7, 8, 9] - note that after 6 the series wraps around, and begins from 0. – Anurag May 20 '13 at 6:59
1  
There is no such guarantee, they're not mutually exclusive. 0 and 9 may not always be together, as either 0 or 9 can be the number that's been removed from the array and added back in randomly. If you want a better picture of what the array may look like, imagine an array of number 0-9 in order (ascending/descending), that can start from any number 0-9, and that "wraps around" at 0/9. Then imagine that one number at a random index has been deleted, then inserted randomly back into the array. – Vadoff May 20 '13 at 7:31

To find the number that is out-of-order you have look at every element in the array. So, you have to iterate over the entire array with complexity O(n).

When you loop through the array, you should

  • calculate the absolute value of the difference between the previous number and the current number.
  • calculate the absolute value of the difference between the current number and next number

If both the above differences are greater than 1 and not equal to n-1 (when the difference is n-1, that is the point where your array flips), then that is number that is out of order.

share|improve this answer
3  
I think one can get away with looking at every other element. – n.m. May 20 '13 at 3:14
1  
@n.m. because the value of any one element is unrelated to the ones next to it, you need to look at every element. For example if the array is {1,2,3,4000,5,6,7}, you cannot just look at 1,3,5,7 and say that everything is fine. – Seph May 20 '13 at 3:29
    
This method would give you a false positive for numbers that follow wherever the out of order number was pulled from, since they are n-2 but are still considered "in order". – Vadoff May 20 '13 at 3:29
    
@Seph: "Filled with numbers 0-9", no 4000. – n.m. May 20 '13 at 3:34
    
{1,2,3,9,5,6,7,8} - same problem even if it is 0-9. You will only look at 1,3,5,7. – srikanta May 20 '13 at 3:38

Look at every other element, and compute the differences.

If most differences are positive, the order is ascending. If most are negative, it's descending; it can be decided exactly like the other case and i will not examine it further.

Of course you need to wrap around and compute the diff between (N-1)th and 0th element, or whatever.

From now on look at the diffs modulo N.

If the diff is 2, this is the regular case of no extra or missing elements; ignore it.

If the diff is 3, an element was yanked from somewhere around here. But we are not looking for its old place, we are looking for its new place; ignore this too.

If the diff is 1, then the out of order element is between these numbers.

If you have any other diff, then you must have two of them next to each other. The out of order element is the one that produces both of these diffs.

In the case of two consecutive numbers swapped, either one can be considered out of order. The diffs produced will be either (1,3) or (3,1) next to each other. This method picks one of the two possible answers.

For the arrays in question:

array -> 2 3 0 4 5 6 7 8 9 1(2)        
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->  -2   5   2   2   -7(=3 mod 10)
             *

In further examples I will not state equality mod 10 to save space.

array -> 5 6 7 9 8 0 1 2 3 4(5) 
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->   2   1   3   2   2
               *

array -> 7 6 5 4 3 8 2 1 0 9(7)        
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->  -2  -2  -1  -2  -3
                   *

array -> 0 5 1 2 3 4 6 7 8 9(0)        
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->   1   2   3   2   2
           *

array -> 4 3 0 2 1 9 8 7 6 5(4)       
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->  -4  -9  -3  -2  -2
             *    

More examples:

array -> 0 2 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9(0)        swapped adjacent elements, case 1
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->   1   3   2   2   2
           *

array -> 0 1 3 2 4 5 6 7 8 9(0)        swapped adjacent elements, case 2
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->   3   1   2   2   2
               *

array -> 0 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 8 9(0)        element removed and inserted at odd pos
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->   3   2   2   1   2
                       *

array -> 0 2 3 4 5 6 1 7 8 9(0)        element removed and inserted at even pos
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->   3   2   6   7   2
                     *

array -> 0 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9(0)        element removed and inserted at odd pos
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->   1   2   2   3   2
           *            

array -> 0 1 7 2 3 4 5 6 8 9(0)        element removed and inserted at even pos
          \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
diffs ->   7   6   2   3   2
             *
share|improve this answer
    
Your algorithm sounds interesting, but I'm having trouble understanding it. Would you mind explaining why it works for the example in the question? – Steven Wexler May 20 '13 at 6:09
    
@steaks: see update. – n.m. May 20 '13 at 8:20
    
Possible edit - "If the diff is 2, everything is fine, ignore it. If the diff is 3, the missing element should go somewhere between here, but the actual element is somewhere else, so ignore it." Also, I think you need a special case for [0,1,2,3,5,4,6,7,8,9]. – Dukeling May 20 '13 at 15:22
    
@Dukeling: yes I forgot to mention 2. For 3, the missing element was somewhere between here, before it was removed; is that's what you mean? Also, why your example is special? It's still 4 and 5 swapped, either one can be picked, the algo picks 4. – n.m. May 20 '13 at 16:32
    
@n.m. Yes, your edit is exactly what I mean. Your right, your code works for the example, I wasn't paying enough attention. – Dukeling May 20 '13 at 17:35

The following contrived examples do not have a unique solution. You need to decide what happens in these cases:

0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 // first item move to end

2, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0 // adjacent items swapped 

For all other cases, luckily the telling trait is that the "out-of-order" item will be more than 1 away from both its neighbors (because #2 above).

for (i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
    int priorIndex = (i-1) % arr.length;
    int nextIndex = (i+1) % arr.length;
    int diffToPriorValue = abs(arr[i] - arr[priorIndex]);
    int diffToNextValue = abs(arr[i] - arr[nextIndex]);
    if (diffToPriorValue > arr.length/2)
        diffToPriorValue = arr.length - diffToPriorValue; // wrap-around
    if (diffToNextValue > arr.length/2)
        diffToNextValue = arr.length - diffToNextValue; // wrap-around
    if (diffToPriorValue != 1 && diffToNextValue != 1)
        return i;
return -1;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 very nice answer...same solution I came up with after reading the question! I especially like that you called out the two ambiguous cases (I only thought of the second). Given more information about how to treat these two cases, you'd have to make a tiny change to handle the first case and a more invasive change for the second where you would have to determine the "order" of the list and wouldn't be able to use absolute value. – Steven Wexler May 20 '13 at 6:01

First I'll start with defining what is “out of order”:

Suppose we have a list of numbers A

If there exist A[i] in A,
Such that A[i-1] <= A[i] <= A[i+1], then A[i] is "in order"
Otherwise, A[i] is "out of order"

ALGORITHM:

FOR i: 1..SIZE(A) DO

    PRINT " "
    PRINT A[i]

    IF A[i-1] <= A[i] <= A[i+1]
    THEN
        CONTINUE
    ELSE
        PRINT "*"
        REMOVE A[i]
    END-IF

END-FOR

TEST:

INPUT: { 2, 3, 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1 }

OUTPUT: { 2, 3, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 }

CONSOLE: 2 3 0* 1* 2* 3 5 6 7 8 9 1*
share|improve this answer
    
1) "in ascending or descending order", so just A[i-1] <= A[i] <= A[i+1] won't work. 2) Each number can only appear once, so it doesn't have to be <=, it can just be <. 3) Only 1 number is in the wrong position. 4) Your algorithm doesn't account for wrap-around. 5) For 0,1,2,3,4,8,5,6,7,9, your algorithm will mark 8 and 5, rather than just 8. 6) Eww @ all-caps. – Dukeling May 20 '13 at 15:04
    
1) The algorithm works according to the given definition. 2) I interpreted "order" as either asc or desc order. 3) the choice of <= or < depends if you allow duplicates or not. 4) what is wrap-around ? 5) given 0,1,2,3,4,8,5,6,7,9 my algorithm will mark only 8, since when 8 is marked, it will be removed(ignored) from the list. .. thanks for the interest in my algorithm, if you hate all-caps, that's the way we use when writing Algorithm Pseudo-code – Khaled.K May 21 '13 at 5:54
    
This is wrap-around: 6,7,8,9,0,1,2,3,4,5 - the sequence starts somewhere in the middle and, once it reaches the end, it continues from the beginning. I've seen (and written) a ton of pseudo-code, but never in all-caps, but, since there isn't a standard, I suppose whomever is allowed to do it whichever way they want. – Dukeling May 21 '13 at 7:01
    
Then I guess my algorithm doesn't support wrap-around, and okay it's not my standard, it's my university standard – Khaled.K May 21 '13 at 7:04

Here's a solution similar to Khalid's.

Two elements are considered adjacent if they can appear next to each other ignorant of wrapping. So, 9 and 0 are considered adjacent elements.

The algorithm cycles through each set of three consecutive elements, and checks if the first one and the third one are adjacent or not. If they are adjacent, then the middle value must be out of order.

I join the given list to itself, thus creating an array of size 20. This takes care of a special case where the number was moved to the beginning or the end of the list.

# checks if two given numbers are adjacent or not, independent of wrapping
def adjacent?(a, b)
  (a - b).abs == 1 || [a, b].sort == [0, 9]
end

# finds the misplaced number in a list
def misplaced_number(list)
  middle_index = 1
  (list + list).each_cons(3).find { |first, second, third|
    adjacent?(first, third)
  }[middle_index]
end

Checked with the following tests. The second and last test failed because of ambiguity.

test([2, 3, 0, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1], 0)
test([5, 6, 7, 9, 8, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4], 8) # [FAIL: result = 9]
test([7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 8, 2, 1, 0, 9], 8)
test([0, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9], 5)
test([4, 3, 0, 2, 1, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5], 0)
test([2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, 1, 3], 2) # [FAIL: result = 3]

def test(list, expected)
  result = misplaced_number(list)
  assert result == expected_value, "Got #{result} but expected #{expected} from list #{list}"
end
share|improve this answer

So combining srikanta and n.m.'s in Haskell:

import Data.List (findIndex)

f s = maybe (-1) (+1) . findIndex (==1)
    $ zipWith (\a b -> abs (a - b)) s (drop 2 s ++ take 2 s)


*Main> f [2,3,0,4,5,6,7,8,9,1]
2
*Main> f [5,6,7,9,8,0,1,2,3,4]
3
...
share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
int array[10] = { 4, 3, 1, 0, 9, 8, 7, 2, 6, 5};

size_t idx;
int diff, state,this,next;

#define COUNT (sizeof array/sizeof array[0])
#define FOLD(n,i) ((i)%(n))
#define FETCH(a,i) a[FOLD(COUNT,(i))]

this = FETCH(array,COUNT-1);
next = FETCH(array,0);
diff = next - this;
state = (diff < -1 || diff >1) ? 1: 0;
for (idx = 0; idx < COUNT; idx++) {
        this = next;
        next = FETCH(array,idx+1);
        diff = next - this;
        state = (state<<1) & 3;
        state |= (diff < -1 || diff >1) ? 1: 0;
        if (state==3) putc('*', stdout);
        printf("%d ", this );
        }
putc('\n', stdout);
return 0;
}

Output:

4 3 1 0 9 8 7 *2 6 5
share|improve this answer
int element, backdiff, forwarddiff;
boolean elementFound = false;

if(abs(a[0] - a[1]) == 2 )
    return "Out of Order Element is @ position" + (a[0] - a[1] > 0 ? 0 : 1);
for (i=1;i<n;i++){
    if(!elementFound){
        backdiff = abs(a[i-1] - a[i]);
        forwarddiff = abs(a[i+1] - a[i]);
        if( (backdiff == 1 && forwarddiff == 1) || 
            (backdiff == n-1 && forwarddiff == 1) ||
                (backdiff == 1 && forwarddiff == n-1) )
            continue;
        if(forwarddiff == 2 || backdiff == 2)
            element = abs(a[i]-(a[i-1]+a[i+1]));
            elementFound = true;

        if(forwarddiff > 2 || backdiff > 2)
            return "Out of Order Element is @ position" + (forwarddiff > 2 ? (i+1) : i);

    } else {
        if(a[i] == element)
            return "Out of Order Element is @ position" + (i);
    }   
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please don't just dump code; explain your solution as well. – Lambda Fairy Oct 3 '13 at 1:33

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