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It appears that it is not allowed to declare multiple variables of distinct types using the auto keyword. I can't figure out the wording in the standard that would prevent it however.

auto i = 1, j = 1.0; //deduction failure (several compilers)

Historically I understand since you have only one decl-specifier-spec. However, the rules in the standard don't seem to preclude, in fact they encourage, that auto can be a distinct type for each. Consider these paragraphs:

8-3 Each init-declarator in a declaration is analyzed separately as if it was in a declaration by itself.

7.1.6.4-7 If the list of declarators contains more than one declarator, the type of each declared variable is determined as described above. [...]

Even without auto not all variables needed to have the same type, as certain modifiers like * could be applied to each declarator individually. To me it appears now that the wording allows each auto declarator to be a completely distinct type.

Which paragraph would prohibit this?

share|improve this question
    
How you can declare auto variable like above? It must be as auto int i = 1,j = 1; this will work absolutely fine.No errors.Or your question is differ? – Astro - Amit May 20 '13 at 3:57
    
@Astro, This is a question about the C++11 auto keyword which deduces the type for you. Specifically whether it can deduce multiple types. – edA-qa mort-ora-y May 20 '13 at 4:03
2  
@Astro: auto can be used for type inference in C++11. The old use of auto as a storage class specifier is deprecated and not relevant to this question. – Mankarse May 20 '13 at 4:06
    
Yes i read now was not aware of this change in C++11 – Astro - Amit May 20 '13 at 4:11
1  
BTW - the example usage in 7.1.6.4/3 is const auto *v = &x, u = 6; // OK: v has type const int*, u has type const int - clearly the idea is that the type deduction from the first variable can be utilised when creating subsequent ones.... – Tony D May 20 '13 at 4:30
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Type deduction is performed for every object in the list, but the final result must be a single type [dcl.spec.auto]/7 (emphasis mine):

If the list of declarators contains more than one declarator, the type of each declared variable is determined as described above. If the type deduced for the template parameter U is not the same in each deduction, the program is ill-formed.

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Yes, that bit of paragraph wasn't in the draft I happened to be reading. The '...' in my question comes after that. I bought the final standard to verify my question, as I was suspicious. – edA-qa mort-ora-y May 20 '13 at 4:22
    
Isn't the answer actually in [dcl.spec.auto]/6, not [dcl.spec.auto]/7? – BЈовић May 22 '13 at 8:34

I found the corrected wording (it is one of those which actually differs between the final a late draft and the official standard).

7.1.6.4-7 If the list of declarators contains more than one declarator, the type of each declared variable is determined as described above. If the type deduced for the template parameter U is not the same in each deduction, the program is ill-formed.

Where 'U' is described in the previous paragraph to be an invented type used for the deduction of each parameter. It's an unfortunate change to the draft since it would have been a very nice feature. (I may also be misunderstanding the previous paragraph in the standard though, as it also deals with std::initializer_list)

share|improve this answer
    
N3337 has that paragraph too. – Nicol Bolas May 20 '13 at 4:11
    
I could see this making it marginally easier on compiler implementors mayhap. – Yakk May 20 '13 at 4:40

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