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I have the following data.table:

  dt=structure(list(a = c("10", "10", "20", "30", "10", "25", "10"
    ), b = c("0.605887455840394", "0", "0.709466017509524", "0", 
    "0.585528817843856", "-0.109303314681054", "-0.453497173462763"
    ), c = c("-0.919322002474128", "0", "0.630098551068391", "0", 
    "-1.81795596770373", "-0.276184105225216", "-0.284159743943371"
    ), d = c("-0.750531994502331", "0", "1.81731204370422", "0", 
    "-0.116247806352002", "0.370627864257954", "0.520216457554957"
    ), e = c("0.298723699267293", "0", "-0.886357521243213", "0", 
    "0.816899839520583", "-0.331577589942552", "1.12071265166956"
    ), key = c("A", "A", "B", "B", "C", "C", "C")), .Names = c("a", 
    "b", "c", "d", "e", "key"), row.names = c(NA, -7L), class = c("data.table", 
        "data.frame"), sorted = "key")

Which gives me a datatable similar to that shown below.

    a                  b                  c                  d                  e key
1: 10  0.605887455840394 -0.919322002474128 -0.750531994502331  0.298723699267293   A
2: 10                  0                  0                  0                  0   A
3: 20  0.709466017509524  0.630098551068391   1.81731204370422 -0.886357521243213   B
4: 30                  0                  0                  0                  0   B
5: 10  0.585528817843856  -1.81795596770373 -0.116247806352002  0.816899839520583   C
6: 25 -0.109303314681054 -0.276184105225216  0.370627864257954 -0.331577589942552   C
7: 10 -0.453497173462763 -0.284159743943371  0.520216457554957   1.12071265166956   C

I'd like to do a subsetting operation that removes the rows with all zeros.

I was thinking of something along the lines of

dt[!(all(i[2:4) == 0)] but I'm not sure how to actually state that in data.table

would be grateful for any help with this.

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When reading in your "dt", I get an error. I think you may need to define a new column that indicates whether the others are all zeros. –  Frank May 20 '13 at 6:20
1  
hi @Frank just fixed it I think. The dput added an internal pointer reference that I've now deleted at the end of the list and it loads in my system now. thanks –  Tahnoon Pasha May 20 '13 at 6:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a two-step solution:

dt[
    !dt[,
        .I[all(sapply(.SD,function(x)x=="0"))]
    ,by=1:nrow(dt),.SDcols=letters[2:5]]$V1
]

yielding

    a                  b                  c                  d                  e key
1: 10  0.605887455840394 -0.919322002474128 -0.750531994502331  0.298723699267293   A
2: 20  0.709466017509524  0.630098551068391   1.81731204370422 -0.886357521243213   B
3: 10  0.585528817843856  -1.81795596770373 -0.116247806352002  0.816899839520583   C
4: 25 -0.109303314681054 -0.276184105225216  0.370627864257954 -0.331577589942552   C
5: 10 -0.453497173462763 -0.284159743943371  0.520216457554957   1.12071265166956   C

The inner part selects the row indices ".I" satisfying the condition. The outer bracket subsets "dt" by excluding those rows by using the not "!" operator.

share|improve this answer
    
hi @Frank, tried that and unfortunately it generates a result of TRUE for all of them. hope the edit above helps. Appreciate your help with this. –  Tahnoon Pasha May 20 '13 at 6:32
1  
@TahnoonPasha Okay, I think it works now. –  Frank May 20 '13 at 6:50
    
Thanks @Frank. That is awesome. Really like the use of the .I - an new learning for me.. :-) –  Tahnoon Pasha May 20 '13 at 6:59

This seems the perfect opportunity to use a not-join. This will require setting the key to be the columns you wish to subset on

keys <- names(dt)[2:5]
setkeyv(dt, keys)

 dt[!as.list(rep("0", length(keys)))]

Note that currently you key columns are character, which will be more efficient than if they were numeric.

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Great answer @mnel. Thank you. I've already accepted Franks answer although this is actually a more elegant solution - will up vote elsewhere to make up for it. –  Tahnoon Pasha May 20 '13 at 22:02

1) The first line creates a logical vector that selects out the appropriate rows and the second line selects them:

ok <- dt[, ! apply(.SD == 0, 1, all), .SDcols = 2:5]
dt[ok]

2) We could also write it in terms of any with a savings of one character plus spaces:

ok <- dt[, apply(.SD != 0, 1, any), .SDcols = 2:5]
dt[ok]

3) For a small number of columns this is even shorter:

dt[ apply(cbind(b, c, d, e) != 0, 1, any) ]

4) and also for a small number of columns this one is shorter still and simpler

dt[ b != 0 | c != 0 | d != 0 | e != 0 ]
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