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int option;
int invalidOption2 = 0;

while(invalidOption2 == 0){
      try{
        cin>>option;
        if(!cin){
            error("invalid input");
        }
        if(option<1 || option>2){
            error("invalid input");
        }
        if(option==1) {
            invalidOption2 = 1;
            cout<<"option 1 was selected"<<endl;
        }
        else if(option==2) {
            invalidOption2 = 1;
                        cout<<"option 2 was selected"<<endl;
        }       
      }
      catch(runtime_error& e) { 
              cerr <<"Please enter a valid option" << endl;
      }
}

When using the above code, for the first value I input it will move on to the next line and wait for another input, instead of displaying either the option messages or the error message. However when I enter a second value it works as normal.

for example if I entered

a (nothing happens here, so I need to enter another value)

1

"you have selected option 1"

would be displayed and no error message for the original invalid input.

I would like to know how to get the result below instead.

a

"Please select a valid option"

1

"you have selected option 1"

any help would be appreciated

share|improve this question
    
what type is 'option'? –  Bathsheba May 20 '13 at 7:33
    
sorry, I'll edit it into the question, option is type int –  user2383238 May 20 '13 at 8:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You won't get to the "Please enter a valid option" unless an exception is thrown. You don't show error, but if it doesn't throw an exception, you'll never get to the catch block.

Also, cin >> option almost certainly leaves a new line in the buffer, which may cause later problems, and whien you enter an alpha, if option is type int, cin will enter an error state, which needs to be cleared (and the erronous input removed). So in the error case (!cin), you need to call cin.clear(), and in all cases, you probably want to call cin.ignore( std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n' ).

An alternative solution, which avoids most of these problems, is to read complete lines (using std::getline( std::cin, line )), and then use std::istringstream to parse the line. This will leave std::cin in a good state, and ready to input the next line.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry I don't really understand what you mean by it won't display the message unless an exception is thrown. If I entered a and then another a it would catch the error for the second a but not the first. –  user2383238 May 20 '13 at 8:46
    
Without seeing error, it's impossible to say, but you output "Please enter a valid option" in a catch block, which means that it will not be executed unless there is an exception. –  James Kanze May 20 '13 at 9:16
    
so I need to throw an exception if the input is invalid? I've never really used throw before so I'm not really sure what to do? I might be better off using your second idea instead. –  user2383238 May 20 '13 at 9:32
    
@user2383238 Using getline on the actual input, then istringstream to parse it, is more or less the consecrated idiom for line oriented input. –  James Kanze May 20 '13 at 10:22
    
I ended up using getline with istringstream and it worked perfectly, thank you very much for your help. –  user2383238 May 20 '13 at 16:20

Option is likely of integer type, so cin can't read 'a' into it, so it is ignored.

Is this your case?

You could modify it like this:

char option;
while(invalidOption2 == 0){
    try{
        cin>>option;
        if(!cin){
            error("invalid input");
        }
        if(option<'1' || option>'2'){
            error("invalid input");
        }
        if(option=='1') {
            invalidOption2 = 1;
            cout<<"option 1 was selected"<<endl;
        }
        else if(option=='2') {
            invalidOption2 = 1;
            cout<<"option 2 was selected"<<endl;
        }       
    }
    catch(runtime_error& e) { 
        cerr <<"Please enter a valid option" << endl;
    }
}

This should work how you expect it to.

However, construction like this:

char option;
while (cin >> option) {
    if ((option == '1') || (option == '2')) {
        break;
    }
    else {
        cout << "Please enter 1 or 2." << endl;
    }
}
cout << "option " << option " << " was selected" << endl;

Is probably better ^_^

share|improve this answer
1  
Why not while ( std::cin >> option && option != '1' && optionn != '2' ) std::cout << "Please enter 1 or 2: " << std::endl;. Why confuse the code with multiple exits from the loop, and tests for the end condition all over the place. –  James Kanze May 20 '13 at 8:07
    
thanks for the help, but I tried declaring option as a character instead of int, and I still get the same problem. I haven't tested your newest code yet, but what happens if I enter a string for option, will it be able to deal with this? –  user2383238 May 20 '13 at 8:20
    
I don't see reason why not.. If you change type to string and compare againts strings in the if, it should work. Multiline strings could be problem, but that's not the case, right? –  Paladin May 20 '13 at 8:41
    
thanks, I'll try that and see if it works. –  user2383238 May 20 '13 at 8:48

I think this looks a better code (at least for the eyes):

int option;
int invalidOption2 = 0;

while(invalidOption2 == 0)
{
      try
      {
        cin>>option;
        switch(option)
        {       

        case 1 : 
            invalidOption2 = 1;
            cout<<"option 1 was selected"<<endl;   
            break;     
        case 2 : 
            invalidOption2 = 1;
            cout<<"option 2 was selected"<<endl;
            break;
        default : 
            error("invalid input");       

         }
      catch(runtime_error& e)
      { 
              cerr <<"Please enter a valid option" << endl;
      }
}

If you still think you have problems with int and char with cin then better use :

option = getchar(); 
share|improve this answer

I think calling cin twice may be the issue here, but I'm not certain. Something like this should work well too:

char option[80]; // 80 is the standard terminal line length
bool loop = 1;
while(loop)
{
    cin >> option;
    if (option[1]=='\n') // testing if string is length 1
    {
        cout << "Please select a valid input\n";
        continue; // if not, display error and try again
    };
    switch(option[0])
    {
        case '1': loop=0; break; // add whatever before break
        case '2': loop=0; break;
        default: cout << "please select a valid input\n"; break;
    };
};
cout << "Option "<< option << "was selected\n";

I didn't compile this, but it should be okay.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll take a look at this in a minute, and see if it works –  user2383238 May 20 '13 at 11:04

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