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Hello All,

//Pleas i have a simple Problem. I need, when Filesystemwatcher sees the File -after fsw start the Timer for Closing Application (Application will be Closed after 2 second, when is file created)//

Thank you user "Never Quit" *

Finaly i Have this "easy" Code :-)

 public partial class Form1 : Form
{

    System.Timers.Timer casovac = new System.Timers.Timer();
    int totalSeconds = 0;

    public Form1()
    {

        InitializeComponent();
        casovac.Interval = 1000;
        casovac.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(cas_elapsed);

    }
    void cas_elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
          totalSeconds++;

        if (totalSeconds == 3) 
        {
            casovac.Stop();
            Application.Exit();
        }
    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        FileSystemWatcher fsw = new FileSystemWatcher();

        fsw.Path = Application.StartupPath + "\\OUT\\";
        fsw.Filter = "file.exe";
        fsw.IncludeSubdirectories = true;
        fsw.NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastAccess | NotifyFilters.LastWrite
        | NotifyFilters.FileName | NotifyFilters.DirectoryName;
        fsw.Changed += new FileSystemEventHandler(fsw_changed);
        fsw.Created += new FileSystemEventHandler(fsw_changed);
        fsw.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
    }
    private void fsw_changed(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
    {

        casovac.Start();         
    }




}

}

But Thank you All ;-)

share|improve this question
    
"logical simple Problem", a what now? :) –  Moo-Juice May 20 '13 at 8:43
    
you do not need both .Start() and Enabled=true -- they both do the same thing. Put a break point on fsw_changed to make sure it is called. Also, how do you define the timer? make sure you have subscribed to the Tick event and have set the correct interval. –  Eren Ersönmez May 20 '13 at 8:47
2  
By the way when you ask questions on SO, "here's some code, tell me what's wrong with it" is an antipattern. Please be very specific about what you expect to happen, and what really happens. –  Eren Ersönmez May 20 '13 at 8:50
    
You should probably debug this, line by line, and come back with what you think happened, as opposed to what should happen. –  zack_falcon May 20 '13 at 9:09
    
Sorry for me Bad English, i have tried Edit me Code, nothing success. Timer Setting is Generate_members - True, Modifiers - Private, Interval - 2000 –  Messiah1985 May 20 '13 at 9:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you want to create one FileSystemWatcher which monitors your specified path and gives you an event when it founds "file.exe". As soon your program found this file timer get started and after several time(2 sec) your application get closed automatically. Right???

I've made demo which fulfill your requirement.

public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        System.Timers.Timer tim = new System.Timers.Timer();
        int totalSeconds = 0;

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            tim.Interval = 1000; // 1 sec
            tim.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(tim_Elapsed);
        }

        void tim_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            // .....
            totalSeconds++;

            if (totalSeconds == 2) // 2 sec of wait
            {
                tim.Stop();
                Application.Exit();
            }
        }

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            FileSystemWatcher fsw = new FileSystemWatcher("D:\\");

            fsw.IncludeSubdirectories = true;
            fsw.Filter = "file.exe";

            fsw.NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastAccess | NotifyFilters.LastWrite
            | NotifyFilters.FileName | NotifyFilters.DirectoryName;

            fsw.Changed += new FileSystemEventHandler(OnChanged);

            fsw.Created += new FileSystemEventHandler(OnCreated);

            fsw.Deleted += new FileSystemEventHandler(OnDeleted);

            fsw.Renamed += new RenamedEventHandler(OnRenamed);           

            fsw.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
        }



        private  void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
        {
            //  Show that a file has been changed

            WatcherChangeTypes wct = e.ChangeType;                
            MessageBox.Show("OnChanged File " + e.FullPath + wct.ToString());    
            tim.Start();// start timer as you get file.exe found....
        }

        private void OnCreated(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
        {
            //  Show that a file has been created

            WatcherChangeTypes wct = e.ChangeType;                
            MessageBox.Show("OnCreated File " + e.FullPath + wct.ToString());    
            tim.Start();// start timer as you get file.exe found....
        }

        private void OnDeleted(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
        {
            //  Show that a file has been deleted.

            WatcherChangeTypes wct = e.ChangeType;               
            MessageBox.Show("OnDeleted File " + e.FullPath + wct.ToString());    
            tim.Start();// start timer as you get file.exe found....
        }

        //  This method is called when a file is renamed. 
        private  void OnRenamed(object source, RenamedEventArgs e)
        {
            //  Show that a file has been renamed.

            WatcherChangeTypes wct = e.ChangeType;               
            MessageBox.Show("OnRenamed File " + e.OldFullPath + e.FullPath + wct.ToString());    
            tim.Start(); // start timer as you get file.exe found....
        }
    }

Hope this will help you....

share|improve this answer
    
YES ! This is true :-) ...Really sorry for my Bad English..But this code Looks to Hard for easy Idea :-) –  Messiah1985 May 20 '13 at 12:19
    
@Messiah1985 There is nothing hard in this sample code. It has simple Timer with event and FileSystemWatcher with its events. Please accept it if you find helpful to you. –  Never Quit May 20 '13 at 12:22
    
Yes, I Accept it ;-) –  Messiah1985 May 20 '13 at 12:26

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