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MySQL table with couple of fields:

  • id - PRIMARY KEY
  • url - CHAR(255).

url field is also unique and indexed. Currently have couple of hundreds of thousands entries in that table. MySQL gets really slow.

The idea is: if I add hash BIGINT UNIQUE INDEXED field, and create composite index hash/url - will it work faster? Means will MySQL first check my hash/url pair using hash and then url? Will it be faster?

If answer is yes - for what reason this is not transparently implemented for indexed strings in MySQL?

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You are aware that url LIKE '%' +string+ '%' doesn't use an index? –  OMG Ponies Nov 3 '09 at 2:18
    
Well, indeed it's indexed somehow, however I need to select using exact match. And to me BIGINT hash would work better. Just currious why it's not implemented transparently within MySQL. –  Archer Nov 3 '09 at 8:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The idea is: if I add hash BIGINT UNIQUE INDEXED field, and create composite index hash/url - will it work faster?

The key lookup on a BIGINT field is faster than on a CHAR field (surprisingly, performance gain is more noticeable on a key miss than on a key hit).

Note, however, that a BIGINT hash has very high probability of hash collisions, that's why I'd not recommend to use it in a UNIQUE field

Means will MySQL first check my hash/url pair using hash and then url?

If you create a composite key on (hash, url) and search for the hash only, it will use the ref condition on the hash part of the index.

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@Quassnoi: I've used this hash technique before. Would you suggest md5(), sha1(), or other? –  memnoch_proxy Nov 5 '09 at 18:21
    
Cryptographic strength is not much of an issue here. MD4 is fastest, MD5 is built into MySQL, so I'd use the former for the hashing outside MySQL and the latter for the hashing inside MySQL. –  Quassnoi Nov 5 '09 at 18:27

+1 Quassnoi

Doing a lookup on hash would definitely be much faster. I created a similar style table but stored very long URIs, and had to use a TEXT type, so a composite key didn't apply there. URLs and URIs are often much longer than a char field can be. I've stored them broken down into multiple tables, and even then, after a few million URLs, I had to consider partitioning the URL/URIs tables. Roughly:

table hostnames:
    id int(11), 
    hostname char(255), 
    unique ( hostname )
table uri:
   id int(11),
   digest char(33),
   uri text,
   unique digest
table querystr: 
   -- like uri table
table urls:
   id int(11),
   fk_host int(11),
   fk_uri int(11),
   fk_query int(11)
   unique u ( id, fk_host, fk_uri, fk_query )

If you need to search through a few million URLs or URIs in a free-text manner, using LIKE '%foo%' won't work well. Consider a more text-search oriented MySQL extension or a library like Lucene/Solr for heavy searching.

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