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I'm doing a schedule book, and I'm saving a .txt all my objects, that works fine, the problem comes when I read them, my program reads , when the end of the file comes, my program doesn't know what to do, I won't put my code because it's a mess right now, but here's my teacher's code, which is the one that I'm using as a template to do mine:

try{
  //***Instructions for reading***

  //It creates a streamobject with the file's name and asigned format

  FileInputStream fileIn = new FileInputStream("Serializado.txt");

  //It creates an inputobject, so it can represent the object

  ObjectInputStream objIn= new ObjectInputStream(fileIn);

  while (fileIn != null) {

    //with readObject() method,  it extracts the object's content                               

    obInp= (NewAlumno) objIn.readObject(); //Se hace un "cast" a NewAlumno
    System.out.print("Nombre   :" + obInp);
    System.out.print(", Sexo: " + obInp.getSexo());
    System.out.print(", Direccion: "+ obInp.getDireccion());    
    System.out.print(", Promedio: " + obInp.getpromedioPoo());
    System.out.print(", Telefono: " + obInp.getTelefono()+"\n");
  }

  objIn.close();
} catch(Exception e){}  

}

As you can see, the catch exception it's empty, so, when i use my teacher's code, it looks like it's working flawlessly, but, i put a println there, and it always prints it. Meaning that something's wrong, and i'm pretty sure that is the

while(fileIn != null)

bacause Netbeans says that this expression is never null. So i'm guessing that the program doesn't know what to do after he reaches the end of the file... Any sugestions pals? Thanks in an advance!

Here is the exception:

java.io.EOFException 
  at java.io.ObjectInputStream$BlockDataInputStream.peekByte(ObjectInputStream.java:2‌​577) 
  at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readObject0(ObjectInputStream.java:1315) 
  at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readObject(ObjectInputStream.java:369) 
  at profegraba.Persistencia.main(Persistencia.java:81)
share|improve this question
1  
Put e.printStackTrace() in the catch clause and post the results. –  Duncan May 20 '13 at 10:02
    
Here: java.io.EOFException at java.io.ObjectInputStream$BlockDataInputStream.peekByte(ObjectInputStream.java:2‌​577) at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readObject0(ObjectInputStream.java:1315) at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readObject(ObjectInputStream.java:369) at profegraba.Persistencia.main(Persistencia.java:81) –  Hector Hammett May 20 '13 at 10:09
    
@HectorHammett That exception means that you reached the end of the file, but you still ask for more objects to be read. The program can't read any more, because it has reached the end of the file, so the exception is thrown. –  afsantos May 20 '13 at 10:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That exception means that you reached the end of the file, but you still ask for more objects to be read. The program can't read any more, because it has reached the end of the file, so the exception is thrown.

As mentioned before, you should handle your resources more carefully.

You should catch the exception and handle it naturally.

ObjectInputStream objIn = null;
try {
    FileInputStream fileIn = new FileInputStream("Serializado.txt");
    if (fileIn == null) {
        throw new IOException("Can't find file.");
    }
    objIn= new ObjectInputStream(fileIn);

    while (true) {
        obInp= (NewAlumno) objIn.readObject();
        System.out.print("Nombre   :" + obInp);
        System.out.print(", Sexo: " + obInp.getSexo());
        System.out.print(", Direccion: "+ obInp.getDireccion());    
        System.out.print(", Promedio: " + obInp.getpromedioPoo());
        System.out.print(", Telefono: " + obInp.getTelefono()+"\n");
    }
} catch (EOFException e) {
    // Ignore or do whatever you wanted to signal the end of file.
} catch (Exception ex) {
    ex.printStrackTrace();
} finally {
    try {
        if (objIn != null) {
            objIn.close();
        }
    } catch (IOException closeException) {
        closeException.printStackTrace();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
There are few correct uses of available(), and this isn't one of them. It doesn't tell you whether you've reached the end of the stream: it tells you, maybe, how many bytes are available to be read without blocking. It isn't at all the same thing. –  EJP May 20 '13 at 10:21
    
@EJP Indeed, well thought. I'll fix my answer. Catching the exception is definitely the way to go here. –  afsantos May 20 '13 at 10:22
    
Ohh wow, thanks to all of you, it means that i was in the right way. My Professor's code doesn't know what to do with the end of the file, and also i get the idea from afsantos of using the exception to control the program flow, but also i get the explanation from @Duncan Jones. Obviously it feels "Wrong" to use an exception to control your program... but i think it's a very good option due the time. Thanks to all of you guys. –  Hector Hammett May 20 '13 at 10:57
1  
@HectorHammett Yes, I think it's the only option in your case. I was merely throwing out some thoughts for later consideration if you do this for real. –  Duncan May 20 '13 at 11:37

ObjectInputStream.readObject() throws EOFException when the end of the stream is reached. Your loop should be of the form while (true) or for (;;) and it should contain a catch (EOFException exc) block which breaks out of the loop.

Testing while (fileIn != null) is entirely futile.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure I love the idea of catching an EOFException to control program flow. If several objects were being written, I'd advocate wrapping them in a container and writing that. Since ObjectOutputStreams don't place nicely if you append to them, one will almost always know the number of objects to be written at the time of writing. –  Duncan May 20 '13 at 10:26
    
@DuncanJones Unfortunately the designers of the API didn't have the benefit of your likes and dislikes when they wrote it. It doesn't always make sense to convolute the code just to please arbitary canons of taste, especially those erected independently of the API design. –  EJP May 20 '13 at 10:27
    
I'm not convinced this is the way the designers of the API intended the stream to be used. The JavaDocs for ObjectInputStream don't suggest this as a pattern. They don't even explicitly reference EOFException by name. Anyway, it appears we won't agree on this issue so I'll return to under my bridge. –  Duncan May 20 '13 at 10:30
    
@DuncanJones The fact of the matter is that the method does throw EOFException at end of stream. I don't see what isn't convincing about that. It shares this property with most of the methods of DataInput, which it extends. There's no room for debate about it. The fact also remains that it isn't necessarily convenient to collect all the objects being written prior to writing any of them. –  EJP May 20 '13 at 10:33
    
An EOFException is also thrown if the stream data (i.e. the file) has been truncated, so how would you tell the difference in your design? Just because an API throws an exception doesn't mean the API designers expect you to use that to control behaviour. –  Duncan May 20 '13 at 10:42

The while loop is completely incorrect

while (fileIn != null) {

If your input file exists, then fileIn will always be non-null. You should check if fileIn is null immediately after constructing it, however, in case the file path is wrong.

Without the while loop, you are then just reading one object from the stream. Whether this is correct or not, I don't know. However, one should generally know how many objects were written to the stream so that the corresponding number of objects can be read back.

(You could read until you get an EOFException, however I wouldn't personally condone that. I'd suggest you instead stored a container object with a number of sub-objects. An EOFException may be thrown for reasons other than because the last object has been read successfully. However, I appreciate you may be forced to code this way to complete your assignment).

Finally, you need to ensure your input streams are closed, even if an exception occurs. If you are using Java 7, the try-with-resources construct can make this easier.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, the thing is that i'm not able to know how many objects i'll put on the stream, because it's suposed to be variable, and be able to erae files... this is a mess. Thanks man, i'm gonna try to solve this. –  Hector Hammett May 20 '13 at 10:19
    
You don't need to know how many objects were written to the stream. –  EJP May 20 '13 at 10:20
    
@Afsantos Yeah, that's what i thought, but i don't know how to tell the program to stop after it reaches the end of the file. This is my teachers code and it's not working correctly... and i'm still looking for a solution, Any Ideas? –  Hector Hammett May 20 '13 at 10:21

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