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I'm trying to calculate the entropy feature of sub-windows in an image. Here is the code I wrote:

  def genHist(img):
    hist = np.histogram(img, np.arange(0, 256), normed=True)
    return hist[0]

  def calcEntropy(hist):
    logs = np.nan_to_num(np.log2(hist))
    hist_loghist = hist * logs
    entropy = -1 * hist_loghist.sum()
    return entropy  

   img = cv2.imread("lena.jpg", 0)
   result = np.zeros(img.shape, dtype=np.float16)
   h, w = img.shape
   subwin_size = 5
   for y in xrange(subwin_size, h-subwin_size):
       for x in xrange(subwin_size, w-subwin_size):
           subwin = img[y-subwin_size:y+subwin_size, x-subwin_size:x+subwin_size]
           hist = genHist(subwin)         # Generate histogram
           entropy = calcEntropy(hist)    # Calculate entropy
           result[y, x] = entropy

Actually, it works. But the problem is its speed, too slow. Do you have any idea to make it fast?

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2 Answers 2

You can do a couple of modifications to make it more faster.

Your code takes following time in my laptop:

IPython CPU timings (estimated):
  User   :      50.92 s.
  System :       0.01 s.
Wall time:      51.20 s.

I made following modifications :

1 - removed the function genHist and implemented it inside calcEntropy(). It will save, may be 1 or 2 seconds.

2 - Instead of logs = np.nan_to_num(np.log2(hist)), I simply added a small value, 0.00001 to hist before finding log. logs = np.log2(hist+0.00001). It will save 3-4 seconds, but it will slightly change your output. Maximum error I got between two results is 0.0039062. (So it is upto you whether you want this or not)

3 - Changed np.histogram to cv2.calcHist(). It will save more than 25 seconds.

Now, the code takes following time on my laptop :

IPython CPU timings (estimated):
  User   :      13.38 s.
  System :       0.00 s.
Wall time:      13.41 s.

It is more than 3x speed up.

Code :

def calcEntropy(img):
    #hist,_ = np.histogram(img, np.arange(0, 256), normed=True)
    hist = cv2.calcHist([img],[0],None,[256],[0,256])
    hist = hist.ravel()/hist.sum()
    #logs = np.nan_to_num(np.log2(hist))
    logs = np.log2(hist+0.00001)
    #hist_loghist = hist * logs
    entropy = -1 * (hist*logs).sum()
    return entropy  

img = cv2.imread("lena.jpg", 0)
result2 = np.zeros(img.shape, dtype=np.float16)
h, w = img.shape
subwin_size = 5
for y in xrange(subwin_size, h-subwin_size):
   for x in xrange(subwin_size, w-subwin_size):
       subwin = img[y-subwin_size:y+subwin_size, x-subwin_size:x+subwin_size]
       #hist = genHist(subwin)         # Generate histogram
       entropy = calcEntropy(subwin)    # Calculate entropy
       result2.itemset(y,x,entropy)

Now the main problem is two for loops. I think it is a best candidate for Cython implementation and it will give very good results.

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Thank you very much for your helpful answer, Abid! I've been reading your blog since I started learning Python+OpenCV. I'll also try the Cython implementation. –  kyon May 21 '13 at 1:55

As first step you should try to use math.log instead of the corresponding numpy function, which is much slower:

import numpy as np
import math

x=abs(randn(1000000))

#unsing numpy
start = time.time()
for i in x:
    np.log2(i)
print "Runtime: %f s" % (time.time()-start)
>>> Runtime: 3.653858 s

#using math.log
start = time.time()
for i in x:
    math.log(i,2)        # use log with base 2
print "Runtime: %f s" % (time.time()-start)
>>> Runtime: 0.692702 s

The problem with this is that math.log will produce a error with every 0 it encounters. You can bypass this problem by removing all the 0 from the histogramm output. And that has several advantages: 1) math. log will not fail, 2) depending on your image, math.log will be called fewer, which leads to a faster code. You can remove the zeros because 0*log(0) becomes 0 even if log(0) would return a value. Thus, the product does not add to sum of the entropy.

I've been facing the same problem with some audio processing I did, too. Unfortunately I could not improve it beyond the above. If you found a better solution, I would be very pleased if you would post it here.

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2  
numpy.log2 is faster (about 20 times faster on my PC!) than math.log, if you use it right: Don't call the numpy.log in a loop for every number, but call it once for the whole array (the way it's done in the question). Just replace the for i in x: np.log2(i) part with np.log2(x) and see for yourself. Calculating the logarithm of a floating point number takes next to no time on a modern PC, compared to the loop overhead of a Python loop. –  nikie May 20 '13 at 14:47
    
Yeah, you are right! –  MaxPowers May 25 '13 at 9:17

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