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Is it possible to specify that members of a nested class can be accessed by the enclosing class, but not other classes ?

Here's an illustration of the problem (of course my actual code is a bit more complex...) :

public class Journal
{
    public class JournalEntry
    {
        public JournalEntry(object value)
        {
            this.Timestamp = DateTime.Now;
            this.Value = value;
        }

        public DateTime Timestamp { get; private set; }
        public object Value { get; private set; }
    }

    // ...
}

I would like to prevent client code from creating instances of JournalEntry, but Journal must be able to create them. If I make the constructor public, anyone can create instances... but if I make it private, Journal won't be able to !

Note that the JournalEntry class must be public, because I want to be able to expose existing entries to client code.

Any suggestion would be appreciated !


UPDATE: Thanks everyone for your input, I eventually went for the public IJournalEntry interface, implemented by a private JournalEntry class (despite the last requirement in my question...)

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1  
You could make the JournalEntry(object) constructor 'internal'; this would prevent other assemblies from instantiating journal entries but other classes in the same assembly can still make them; however if you're the author of the assembly this might be good enough. –  John K Nov 3 '09 at 2:24
    
yes, I thought of that, but I'd prefer to be unable to create instances even in the same assembly... thanks anyway ! –  Thomas Levesque Nov 3 '09 at 3:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

If your class is not too complex you could either use an interface which is publically visibal and make the actual implementing class private or you could make a protected constructor for the JornalEntry class and have a private class JornalEntryInstance derived from JornalEntry with a public constructor which is actually instantiated by your Journal.

    public class Journal
    {
       public class JournalEntry
        {
            protected JournalEntry(object value)
            {
                this.Timestamp = DateTime.Now;
                this.Value = value;
            }

            public DateTime Timestamp { get; private set; }
            public object Value { get; private set; }
        }

       private class JournalEntryInstance: JournalEntry
       { 
            public JournalEntryInstance(object value): base(value)
            {}
       }
       JournalEntry CreateEntry(object value)
       {
           return new JournalEntryInstance(value);
       }

    }

If your actual class is too complex to do either of that and you can get away with the constructor being not completely invisible, you can make the constructor internal so it is only visible in the assembly.

If that too is infeasible you can always make the constructor private and use reflection to call it from your journal class:

typeof(object).GetConstructor(new Type[] { }).Invoke(new Object[] { value });

Now that I think about it, another possibility would use a private delegate in the containing class which is set from the inner class

    public class Journal
    {
        private static Func<object, JournalEntry> EntryFactory;
        public class JournalEntry
        {
            internal static void Initialize()
            {
                Journal.EntryFactory = CreateEntry;
            }
            private static JournalEntry CreateEntry(object value)
            {
                return new JournalEntry(value);
            }
            private JournalEntry(object value)
            {
                this.Timestamp = DateTime.Now;
                this.Value = value;
            }

            public DateTime Timestamp { get; private set; }
            public object Value { get; private set; }
        }

        static Journal()
        {
            JournalEntry.Initialize();
        }

        static JournalEntry CreateEntry(object value)
        {
            return EntryFactory(value);
        }

    }

This should give you your desired visibility levels without needing to resort on slow reflection or introducing additional classes / interfaces

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The interface is a good solution, don't know why I didn't think of it... Thanks ! –  Thomas Levesque Nov 3 '09 at 3:22

Actually there is a complete and simple solution to this problem that doesn't involve modifying the client code or creating an interface.

This solution is actually faster than the interface-based solution for most cases, and easier to code.

public class Journal
{
  private static Func<object, JournalEntry> _newJournalEntry;

  public class JournalEntry
  {
    static JournalEntry()
    {
      _newJournalEntry = (object) => new JournalEntry(object);
    }
    private JournalEntry(object value)
    {
      ...
share|improve this answer
    
Nice and original approach... I have to remember that one. Thanks ! –  Thomas Levesque Nov 3 '09 at 13:08
    
This is very nice, a precious piece of code! –  Erez Robinson Mar 3 '13 at 8:02
    
Spiffy. The accepted answer has the same general idea but it comes at the bottom of a bunch of other alternatives, so look here! –  aggieNick02 Apr 22 '13 at 15:54
    
Really cool trick, saves me from the pain of maintaining a separate interface. It feels a bit "hackish" though - I don't think I'd recommend this as a design pattern to beginners ;-) –  chris Nov 6 '13 at 11:23
    
+1 for being clever –  AK_ Jun 23 at 8:49

Make JournalEntry a private nested type. Any public members will be visible only to the enclosing type.

public class Journal
{
    private class JournalEntry
    {
    }
}

If you need to make JournalEntry objects available to other classes, expose them via a public interface:

public interface IJournalEntry
{
}

public class Journal
{
    public IEnumerable<IJournalEntry> Entries
    {
        get { ... }
    }

    private class JournalEntry : IJournalEntry
    {
    }
}
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A simpler approach is to just use an internal constructor, but make the caller prove who they are by supplying a reference that only the legitimate caller could know (we don't need to be concerned about non-public reflection, because if the caller has access to non-public reflection then we've already lost the fight - they can access a private constructor directly); for example:

class Outer {
    // don't pass this reference outside of Outer
    private static readonly object token = new object();

    public sealed class Inner {
        // .ctor demands proof of who the caller is
        internal Inner(object token) {
            if (token != Outer.token) {
                throw new InvalidOperationException(
                    "Seriously, don't do that! Or I'll tell!");
            }
            // ...
        } 
    }

    // the outer-class is allowed to create instances...
    private static Inner Create() {
        return new Inner(token);
    }
}
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Good idea! I'll keep this trick in mind, just in case... –  Thomas Levesque May 2 '13 at 15:04

In this case you could either:

  1. Make the constructor internal - this stops those outside this assembly creating new instances or...
  2. Refactor the JournalEntry class to use a public interface and make the actual JournalEntry class private or internal. The interface can then be exposed for collections while the actual implementation is hidden.

I mentioned internal as a valid modifier above however depending on your requirements, private may be the better suited alternative.

Edit: Sorry I mentioned private constructor but you've already dealt with this point in your question. My apologies for not reading it correctly!

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I would make the JournalEntry constructor internal:

public class Journal
{
    public class JournalEntry
    {
        internal JournalEntry(object value)
        {
            this.Timestamp = DateTime.Now;
            this.Value = value;
        }

        public DateTime Timestamp { get; private set; }
        public object Value { get; private set; }
    }

    // ...
}
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