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I need some advice.When I run code analysis tool I get the following

Warning 1 CA2000 : Microsoft.Reliability : In method 'Class1.test.testMethod()', object 'dt' is not disposed along all exception paths. Call System.IDisposable.Dispose on object 'dt' before all references to it are out of scope. How to resolve the warnings??

public void testMethod()
            {
                DataTable dt = new DataTable();
                DataTable dt1= new DataTable();


                try
                {

                    if (dt.Rows.Count == 0)
                    {
                        dt1.Merge(dt);
                    }

                }
                catch
                {
                    throw;
                }
                finally
                {
                    if (dt != null) dt.Dispose();
                    if (dt1 != null) dt1.Dispose();
                }
            }
share|improve this question
    
object 'dt' is not disposed along all exception paths I think the compiler is actually complaining about the empty catch block, but using a using statement (like the currently top rated answer) should be the best practice as you don't even need to call dispose then. EDIT: +1 for being bothered about warnings. –  Izzy May 20 '13 at 12:43

8 Answers 8

Not really sure why you are getting that error, but you can try using statement block in your method and see if the error goes away. Try it like:

public void testMethod()
{
    using (DataTable dt = new DataTable())
    using (DataView dv = new DataView(dt))
    {
        //your work
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, sorry - I noticed that after I posted - I deleted the comment and the downvote. Your syntax is definitely preferred over the OP's, but you did miss why the error's happening. –  Dan Puzey May 20 '13 at 11:25
    
@DanPuzey, missing tools on my machine, otherwise I would have confirmed, but still ,my guess is that instantiation is done outside the try block. –  Habib May 20 '13 at 11:26
    
@saliqueahmad, you are welcome, did that resolve the warning ? –  Habib May 20 '13 at 11:30

From Dispose objects before losing scope

If a disposable object is not explicitly disposed before all references to it are out of scope, the object will be disposed at some indeterminate time when the garbage collector runs the finalizer of the object. Because an exceptional event might occur that will prevent the finalizer of the object from running, the object should be explicitly disposed instead.

To fix a violation of this rule, call System.IDisposable.Dispose on the object before all references to it are out of scope.

Note that you can use the using statement (Using in Visual Basic) to wrap objects that implement IDisposable. Objects wrapped in this manner will automatically be disposed at the close of the using block.

using (DataTable dt = new DataTable())
using (DataView dv = new DataView(dt))
{

}
share|improve this answer

I suspect the error is happening because you are creating two DataViews, and only one of them will ever be disposed: you initialise dv to a new DataView and then assign another in the try block. The one from the initial assignment won't be disposed when you hit the finally, because you'll have no reference to it.

Modify your declaration DataView dv = new DataView () to just declare the variable, and not initialise it:

public void testMethod()
{
    DataTable dt = new DataTable();
    DataView dv = null;

    try
    {
        dv = new DataView(dt);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (dt != null) dt.Dispose();
        if (dv != null) dv.Dispose();
    }
}

NOTE: This directly fixes your second error message (about dv), and indirectly addresses the first (about dt). The first error is raised because, if the redundant initialisation of dv were to throw an exception, dt would not be disposed - so removing that initialisation fixes the error.

share|improve this answer
    
The error was about "dt" variable and not about "dv" as pointed by your fix. Anyway, +1 for the try. –  alexb May 20 '13 at 11:42
    
It seems the fix explanation was similar to mine and same penalized by you. Technically you are right but I think you took them too literally. –  alexb May 20 '13 at 11:49
    
There was one error about each. I'll edit to explain why my code change fixes both. –  Dan Puzey May 20 '13 at 11:49
    
I think your solution will fix only the second warning, this because your dt initialization with new DataTable simply isn't in the same block with its Dispose. Imagine that instead of DataTable you would have a custom type and its ctor would break. –  alexb May 20 '13 at 11:58
    
If the constructor breaks, there's nothing to dispose, so there's no code path in which dt is created and not disposed. I have tested the code; both analysis errors are fixed. I did initially miss that you have to explicitly assign dv = null to compile, mind you (now fixed). –  Dan Puzey May 20 '13 at 12:13

In the 7th line in your code you have created a dummy DataTable that is not used. The compiler is complaining about that DataTable and DataView objects. Change the code like below and it will work.

public class Class1
{
    public class test
    {
        public void testMethod()
        {
            DataTable dt = null;
            DataView dv = null;


         try
        {
            // dt must be assigned a value only within the try block
            dt = new DataTable(dt);
            dv = new DataView(dt);
         }
        catch
        { }
        finally
        {
            if (dt != null) dt.Dispose();
            if (dv != null) dv.Dispose();

         }
        }
    }
}

Update

if you dispose both dt and dv you will get CA2202 error. This is because dt is being disposed twice. Once while disposing dt and once while disposing dv. To avoid that you must assign null to dt at the end of the try/catch block.

    try
    {
        dt = new DataTable(dt);
        dv = new DataView(dt);
        dt=null;
     }
share|improve this answer
    
No, you have nulled both objects, and now the code will fail because dt is null. You only needed to null dv. –  Dan Puzey May 20 '13 at 11:26
    
Thanks Manoj by initiallizing it to null.Warnings are removed. –  salique ahmad May 20 '13 at 11:36
    
@salique, you could accept or upvote the answers that helped you –  alexb May 20 '13 at 11:50
    
@DanPuzey dt must be assigned null outside the try block. You can't assign any other object. Also, you need not down vote every other answer in order to raise your answer up. –  ManojRK May 20 '13 at 12:47
    
@ManoRK: I've done no such thing; I've downvoted two answers that had non-working code in them. You've just edited your answer to fix it, and as such I'll remove the downvote - but you could assign dt outside of the try block. –  Dan Puzey May 20 '13 at 12:58

Exactly what your example code is demonstrating is unclear.

However, if you are trying to clear a false positive on CA2000 when following the MSDN recommended pattern, then there are some known remedies. I outline two cases here where a simple code change enables Code Analysis to recognize the recommended pattern:

  1. The temporary must be named as the string "temp" prepended in camelCase to the ultimate destination IDisposable.
  2. The ultimate destination IDisposable must be the return value of a function.
share|improve this answer

Probably because the DataTable initializer theoretically might break before dispose. You may try to initialize it initially with null and inside the try block with a new DataTable instance. You have the nullable test in finally after all.

Something like

public class Class1
{
    public class test
    {
        public void testMethod()
        {
            DataTable dt = null;

         try
        {
            dt = new DataTable();

         }
        catch
        { }
        finally
        {
            if (dt != null) dt.Dispose();
         }
    }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You've removed the declaration of dv entirely - your code wouldn't compile! –  Dan Puzey May 20 '13 at 11:27
    
I don't understand the down vote. My point was in the comment above, did I wrote something wrong? I removed some parts of the code to make a point with only the dt variable. –  alexb May 20 '13 at 11:30
    
Your code doesn't compile; I'd not consider that a useful answer. –  Dan Puzey May 20 '13 at 11:32
    
But if my arguments help the warning removal would you consider it useful? Don't mind, I guess it's easier to remove the "competition" –  alexb May 20 '13 at 11:36
    
You have my +1. –  alexb May 20 '13 at 11:38

Occurs because you are initializing dt outside of the try block.

public void testMethod()
{
    DataTable dt = null;
    DataView dv = null;
    try
    {
        dt = new DataTable();
        dv = new DataView(dt);
    }
    catch
    {
    }
    finally
    {
        if (dt != null) dt.Dispose();
        if (dv != null) dv.Dispose();
    }
}

}

As stated in other answers you can also use using blocks instead of try...finally.

public void testMethod()
{
    using (DataTable dt = new DataTable())
    {
        using (DataTable dv = new DataView(dt))
        {
        }
    }
}

One question: was it your intention to make the test class a nested class of Class1?

share|improve this answer
   public class test
    {
        public void testMethod()
        {
            DataTable dt = null;
            DataView dv = null;


         try
        {
           dv = new DataView(dt);
         }
        catch
        { }
        finally
        {
            if (dt != null) dt.Dispose();
            if (dv != null) dv.Dispose();

         }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The above code worked for me.Thanks all for ur response. –  salique ahmad May 20 '13 at 12:36

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