Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Templates as I studied we can only have integral arguments i.e int, pointer to other data types and also template template parameter.

But here I am able to pass just a simple class also as a template argument. Is this valid or what I am understanding is wrong. Here is the piece of code.

template <typename T> 
class A {
  public:
         T t;             
};
class B {
  public:
         float f;      
};
template <template<typename> class X, class H> 
class C {
   public:
          H obj;
          X<int> x;                                
};
int main()
{
    C < A, B > my;
    my.obj.f = 2.3f;
    my.x.t = 5;
    cout << "template class object: " << my.obj.f << endl;
    cout << "class object         : " << my.x.t << endl;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are three types of template parameters:

  • Type parameters, for which a type has to be provided as an argument (e.g. int, std::string, etc.). In your example, H is a type parameter;
  • Non-type parameters, for which a value has to be provided as an argument (e.g. 42). Your example does not contain any of these;
  • Template parameters, for which a class template (accepting the right number and type of parameters) has to be provided. In your example, A is a template parameter.

In Templates as I studied we can only have integral arguments i.e int, pointer to other data types and also template template parameter.

What you are referring to in the first part of the above sentence applies to the second category of parameters, i.e. non-type parameters, and the last part of the sentence covers template template parameters.

Indeed, a non-type parameter requires values of a specific type, e.g. int, X* to be passed as arguments when instantiating the template, and there are severe constraints on:

  • The types that can be specified;
  • The nature of the values that can be specified.

For instance, this is forbidden:

template<double D>
struct X { /* ... */ };

While this is allowed:

template<int* P>
struct X { /* ... */ };

But constraints are placed on what can be provided as an argument for P:

int main()
{
    int x = 42;
    X<&x> obj; // ERROR!
}

The part your sentence above does not cover is the first category (type parameters), and that is actually the one which is most commonly found. Among other things, type parameters are used to instantiate generic collections of objects, such as:

std::vector<my_class> v;
share|improve this answer
    
double(or float) is not allowed even in c++11 as a non-type template parameter? –  Koushik May 20 '13 at 11:59
    
@Koushik: Nope, it's not –  Andy Prowl May 20 '13 at 12:00
    
is there any reason other than being historical? –  Koushik May 20 '13 at 12:01
    
@Koushik: While I do not know what are the exact technical reasons why this is not possible, I can imagine template specialization to be one of them: specializing for a certain argument (e.g. template<> class my_template<3.14> { ... };) requires determining equality between floating point numbers, and determining equality between floating point numbers is troublesome. –  Andy Prowl May 20 '13 at 12:05
    
ah yes one of the possible situations. thank you :-) –  Koushik May 20 '13 at 12:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.