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What is the difference between these two?

class Class1
{
    public int a = 1;
}

class Class2
{
    public int a;
    public Class2()
    {
        a = 1;
    }
}

If none, can I skip the default constructor and initialize my variables like in Class1?

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12  
It will make a difference in the order that things happen. –  D Stanley May 20 '13 at 13:49
    
I like putting initialization in the constructor because, if you do something more complicated and it fails, you'll get a more specific error than "failed on initialization." –  zimdanen May 20 '13 at 13:52
    
What is the difference in order? –  Robbert May 20 '13 at 13:52
    
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your specific example, field initializers (Class1) are fine. Arguably, what isn't fine is the public field ;p I would advise either:

// manually implemented property with field-initializer
private int a = 1;
public int A { get { return a;} set { a = value;} }

or:

// automatically implemented property with constructor-based initialization
public int A {get;set;}
public Class1() {
    A = 1;
}

@hvd's answer correctly states the difference. To illustrate a concrete example of where this can give different results, see the following. The main take-away message from this example is really "be very very careful when using virtual methods from constructors".

Output first:

Class1: 1
Class2: 0

Code:

using System;
abstract class SomeBaseClass {
    protected abstract void Write();
    protected SomeBaseClass() {
        Console.Write(GetType().Name + ": ");
        Write();
    }
}
class Class1 : SomeBaseClass {
    protected override void Write() {
        Console.WriteLine(a);
    }
    public int a = 1;
}

class Class2 : SomeBaseClass {
    protected override void Write() {
        Console.WriteLine(a);
    }
    public int a;
    public Class2() {
        a = 1;
    }
}
static class Program {
    static void Main() {
        new Class1();
        new Class2();
    }
}
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You won't notice the difference in your code, but the difference is the order in which things are called and initialized:

  1. Derived class field initializers are run.
  2. Base class field initializers are run.
  3. Base class constructor is run.
  4. Derived class constructor is run.

So, in your Class1 the field is initialized in step 1. In your Class2 the field is initialzed to its default value of 0 in step 1, and then set to 1 in step 4.

More information in Eric Lippert's article series Why do initializers run in the opposite order as constructors, part 1, part 2.

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Calling new Class1() first sets a to 1, then calls the base class constructor.

Calling new Class2() first calls the base class constructor, then sets a to 1.

Since you're deriving from object, the base class constructor does nothing. In other cases, it might make a difference.

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The difference is in the order between constructor call and 'a' field setting, as you can see in the IL for each class:

Class1

  .maxstack  8
  IL_0000:  ldarg.0
  IL_0001:  ldc.i4.1
  IL_0002:  stfld      int32 SandBox.Class1::a
  IL_0007:  ldarg.0
  IL_0008:  call       instance void [mscorlib]System.Object::.ctor()
  IL_000d:  ret

Class2

.maxstack  8
  IL_0000:  ldarg.0
  IL_0001:  call       instance void [mscorlib]System.Object::.ctor()
  IL_0006:  ldarg.0
  IL_0007:  ldc.i4.1
  IL_0008:  stfld      int32 SandBox.Class2::a
  IL_000d:  ret
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1  
for info, it is probably worth using "release" / "optimized" mode when snagging IL output - debug builds sometimes have noticeable differences (the "nop"s are the big clue that this is a debug build) –  Marc Gravell May 20 '13 at 14:02
    
well observed, edited to show optimized code. –  giacomelli May 20 '13 at 14:07
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You can't use initialization for every field, or for automatic properties. The constructor gives you the ability to set values for those fields and properties.

It should be noted that field initialization is prepended to each constructor in a class, by the way, so writing a default constructor (and having all other constructors for a class continue from it) may be more efficient from a code-size perspective. This is a way that the default constructor could really come in handy.

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