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I am playing with Task functions and found a pretty strange problem that I run Task in for loop and pass the parameters to function (i) the loop count is 100. As I expected the output would be like this.
1
2
3
4
5
But the output I get from this function is
100
100
100
I mean it won't change to new parameters. For more details I uploaded the whole project.

Download Sample Program that I made!

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication2
{
public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        CheckForIllegalCrossThreadCalls = false;
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() => button_tast());
    }
    void button_tast()
    {
        Task[] tk =new Task[100];
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            tk[i] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => taskThread(i));
        }
        Task.WaitAll(tk);
    }
void taskThread(int i){
    listBox1.Items.Add(i);
}
}
}
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4  
Please post the relevant code here. –  Romoku May 20 '13 at 14:33
8  
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever That article is with respect to foreach, it's not really about for, for which it's clear that the scope of the variable ought to be outside the loop. –  Servy May 20 '13 at 14:41
    
@Servy - it discusses what closing over a loop variable means, using foreach. It also, right at the top, tells you that the foreach behaviour changes for c# 5, but that for isn't changed. I thought it was a useful enough signpost. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 20 '13 at 14:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's because you're closing over the loop variable. You can rewrite the loop as

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    int taskNumber = i
    tk[i] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => taskThread(taskNumber));
}

and you'll be fine

share|improve this answer
1  
If he hadn't access listBox1 in Tasks. –  I4V May 20 '13 at 14:38
    
Wow, Thanks man its working + I gain pretty nice knowledge thanks! –  Capripio May 20 '13 at 14:40

The problem is that from the point of view of the Tasks, the variable i is global, and can be modified in a non-threadsafe manner. This is easily rectified though....

        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            int localCopy = i;
            tk[i] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => taskThread(localCopy));
        }
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