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Recently I have been reading The Advanced Bash Script and I find something about the variable scope between parent and children shells puzzle me so much. Here it is:

Scene: there are some ways to spawn a child shell: first, (command-lists); second, execute a non-built-in command or a script, and so on.

Since when we run a script in the parent script, the child script can not see the variables in the parent shell. Why is it possible that in the (command-lists) struct the child shell can seen the variable in the parent shell. e.g

  1. (command-lists)

    $ a=100
    $ (echo $a)
    100
    $
    
  2. run a script

    $ cat b.sh
    echo $a
    $ a=100
    $ ./b.sh
    # empty
    

How?

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1 Answer 1

In the case where you have a sub-shell run in the original script:

(command1; command2; ...)

the sub-shell is a direct copy of the original shell created by fork(), and therefore has direct access to its own copy of all the original variables available to it.

Suppose the commands (command1, command2 etc) in the sub-shell are themselves shell scripts. Those commands are executed by the sub-shell calling fork() and then exec() to create a new shell, and the new shell does not inherit the non-exported variables from the original shell.


Addressing your examples directly:

$ a=100
$ (echo $a)
100
$

Here, the sub-shell has its own copy of all the variables (specifically, a) that the parent shell had access to. Any changes made in the sub-shell will not be reflected in the parent shell, of course, so:

$ a=100
$ (echo $a; a=200; echo $a)
100
200
$ echo $a
100
$

Now your second example:

$ cat b.sh
echo $a
$ a=100
$ ./b.sh

$ . ./b.sh
100
$ source ./b.sh
100
$ a=200 ./b.sh
200
$ echo $a
100
$ export a
$ ./b.sh
100
$

The variable a is not exported, so the first time b.sh is run, it has no value for $a so it echoes an empty line. The second two examples are a 'cheat'; the shell reads the script b.sh as if it was part of the current shell (no fork()) so the variables are still accessible to b.sh, hence it echoes 100 each time. (Dot or . is the older mechanism for reading a script in the current shell; the Bourne shell in 7th Edition UNIX used it. The source command is borrowed from the C shells as an equivalent mechanism.)

The command a=200 ./b.sh exports a for the duration of the command, so b.sh sees and echoes the modified value 200 but the main shell has a unchanged. Then when a is exported, it is available to b.sh automatically, hence it sees and echoes the last 100.

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A point I made in my now-deleted answer: try your second example with export a=100 instead of a=100. –  chepner May 20 '13 at 15:45
    
e...Can you make it more clear?"Inside those commands," what this mean? –  Red Lv May 20 '13 at 15:46
    
@chepner yeah, export works well. But the point here is the sub_shell fork philosophy. –  Red Lv May 20 '13 at 15:49
1  
+1. Re: "the sub-shell has direct access to all the variables (specifically, a) that the parent shell had access to": Since (as you point out) "Any changes made in the sub-shell will not be reflected in the parent shell", I think it would be better to write, "the sub-shell has copies of all the variables (specifically, a) that the parent shell had. –  ruakh May 20 '13 at 16:41
1  
@twalberg you misunderstand the variable expansion, which is only executed before the corresponding command. As it worked as your mentioned, a=10; (a=20;echo $a) would got the 10, rather than the 20.Here is something useful for you:gnu.org/software/bash/manual/html_node/Shell-Expansions.html. –  Red Lv May 20 '13 at 17:34

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