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hi guys doing some more revision, how do the following:

Delete the Beetle belonging to “A Wilks”

person (driver-id, name, address)
car (license, model, year)
accident (report-number, date, location)
owns (driver-id, license) 
participated (driver-id, car, report-number, damage-amount)

here is what i have come up with:

DELETE FROM car
WHERE model = 'beetle'

however i know this is wrong because it will delete all the beetle cars and not just the one owned by A Wilks.

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2  
Can you write a (SELECT) query to show the cars that are 'beetle' and have owner 'A'? If yes, it's easy to turn the query into a DELETE statement. –  ypercube May 20 '13 at 15:46
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
DELETE FROM car
WHERE model = 'beetle'
AND license = (
    SELECT o.license from owns o INNER JOIN person p
    ON o.driver-id = p.driver-id
    WHERE p.name = 'A Wilks'
)
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DELETE FROM car
WHERE model = 'Beetle' AND license IN (
  SELECT license
  FROM owns
  INNER JOIN Person ON owns.driver_id = person.driver_id
  WHERE person_name = 'A Wilks'

You could use license = instead of license IN on the second line of the query if you're sure there will be just one Beetle belonging to "A Wilks".

And please consider sitting down with a copy of MySQL and trying some of the queries; you'll learn the material better :)

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DELETE FROM car 
USING car 
INNER JOIN owns 
INNER JOIN person
WHERE car.license=owns.license 
AND car.model='Beetle'
AND owns.driver-id=person.driver-id 
AND person.name='A Wilks';

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en///delete.html

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delete from car where model ='beetle' and licence=(select licence owns INNER JOIN Person ON owns.driver_id = person.driver_id WHERE person_name = 'A Wilks')

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The answer given by Philippinedev was a good one and I wanted to note why it is a better technique than the answers that use a subquery.

His answer uses join syntax (best performance and control):

DELETE FROM car 
USING car 
INNER JOIN owns 
INNER JOIN person
WHERE car.license=owns.license 
AND car.model='Beetle'
AND owns.driver-id=person.driver-id 
AND person.name='A Wilks';

He's using the syntax that performs a query with joined tables, and deletes any matching records in the table from the DELETE FROM clause. The alternative approach uses the sub-query format (easy to code, poorer performance):

DELETE FROM car
WHERE model = 'beetle'
AND license = (
    SELECT o.license from owns o INNER JOIN person p
    ON o.driver-id = p.driver-id
    WHERE p.name = 'A Wilks'
)

Sub-queries are more expensive in performance than straight joins. If this were a query being run on a real Department of Motor Vehicles system (with millions of records), you would want to avoid using sub-queries at all costs, and use straight-up joins instead.

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I suggest you add owner to car and do:

DELETE FROM car
WHERE model = 'beetle' and owner = 'ownername'

This will not work unless you have the owner included in car.

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Why downvote??? –  pattyd May 20 '13 at 15:50
    
you can't have two WHERE's in sql. So you should get rid of one of those –  greedybuddha May 20 '13 at 16:09
    
okay thanks! I noticed another person had tow WHERE's so I assumed that I was doing it wrong..... turned out i was right! Thanks @greedybuddha ! –  pattyd May 20 '13 at 17:17
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