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When using the bind function in an iOS project it gives me the error "can't assign requested address" (#49)

Here is the code:

struct sockaddr_in sin;
sin.sin_family      = AF_INET;
sin.sin_port        = htons(local_port);
sin.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("127.0.0.1");
socklen_t sinlen = sizeof(sin);

char sockopt = 1;
setsockopt (listensock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, &sockopt, sizeof(sockopt));
//setsockopt (listensock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_USELOOPBACK, &sockopt, sizeof(sockopt));

if (::bind(listensock, (struct sockaddr *)&sin, sinlen) == -1)
{
    BOOST_LOG(lg) << bf("bind error: %s (%d)", strerror(errno), errno) << std::endl;
    throw std::runtime_error ("Error establishing tunnel: -3");
}

Please help.

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I have also tried using different addresses (other than localhost) and different ports. –  Chris May 20 '13 at 16:17

2 Answers 2

Turns out I needed to zero-out the struct sockaddr_in .... Here's the code that works .

struct sockaddr_in sin;
memset(&sin, 0, sizeof(sin));
sin.sin_family      = AF_INET;
sin.sin_port        = htons(local_port);
sin.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_LOOPBACK);
socklen_t sinlen = sizeof(sin);

char sockopt = 1;
//setsockopt (listensock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, &sockopt, sizeof(sockopt));
setsockopt (listensock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_USELOOPBACK, &sockopt, sizeof(sockopt));

if (::bind(listensock, (struct sockaddr *)&sin, sinlen) == -1)
{
    BOOST_LOG(lg) << bf("bind error: %s (%d)", strerror(errno), errno) << std::endl;
    throw std::runtime_error ("Error establishing tunnel: -3");
}
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1  
This code might run, but I'm not sure other computers are able to reach you using loopback. –  LodeRunner May 20 '13 at 16:52
    
@LodeRunner: No, but binding to loopback is a standard method to restrict access to connections from the same computer. –  Martin R May 20 '13 at 16:55

The address you are binding the socket to (localhost AKA 127.0.0.1 in IPv4) is the address you see yourself as. You need to bind the socket to an address other people on the network see you as.

You can get this address using ipconfig or other system utilities. Alternatively, you can just bind it to "any" address.

sin.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
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