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I want to parallelize a function called unparallelizedfnc. The function calls four other functions (that take a long time to compute) and stores the results. At the end the results are combined. Consider a toy example of my function (of course these are not the four real functions I call and is only for demonstration).

How do I parallelize the computation of result1, result2, result3 and result4 on a computer with multiple cores? I would like it to work on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX. No need to benchmark the parallelized version in this case (It will be slower due to overhead, but in my real code it will be faster).

If the four results were the same function (but with different data) I could just use a parallel for loop (foreach) or a parallel apply but in this case the functions are different.

unparallelizedfnc <- function(x) {

  result1 <- sum(x)
  result2 <- median(x)
  result3 <- min(x)
  result4 <- max(x)

  result <- mean(c(result1,result2,result3, result4))
  result
}


unparallelizedfnc(rnorm(100000))
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You have many options for running functions in parallel. I guess it depends which package you want to use. (I haven't done it yet, myself.) Anyway, here's the list! cran.r-project.org/web/views/HighPerformanceComputing.html –  Frank May 20 '13 at 17:07
1  
Note that result <- mean(result1,result2,result3, result4) will always give you result1 as the result, you have to use result <- mean(c(result1,result2,result3, result4)) if you want the mean of all results. –  Jilber May 20 '13 at 17:11
    
Thanks for catching that Jilber. I edited the question. –  user1134616 May 20 '13 at 17:30
    
It might be useful to check this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/3547831/… –  Ferdinand.kraft May 21 '13 at 0:47
    
@user1134616 Your requirement that it must be independent of OS let's me assume that this is code you want to distribute. If that's the case, you should focus on optimizing the functions instead of using parallelization. –  Roland May 21 '13 at 6:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I corrected your function as suggested by @Jilber first:

unparallelizedfnc <- function(x) {

  result1 <- sum(x)
  result2 <- median(x)
  result3 <- min(x)
  result4 <- max(x)

  result <- mean(c(result1,result2,result3, result4))
  result
}


parallelizedfnc <- function(x) {
  require(parallel)
  funs <- list(sum,median,min,max)
  mean(do.call("c",mclapply(funs,function(fun) fun(x),mc.cores = 4)))
}

set.seed(42)
x <- rnorm(1e8)
identical(unparallelizedfnc(x),parallelizedfnc(x))
#[1] TRUE

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(unparallelizedfnc(x),parallelizedfnc(x),times=3)

# Unit: seconds
#                 expr      min       lq   median       uq      max neval
# unparallelizedfnc(x) 3.155736 3.166381 3.177027 3.195497 3.213967     3
#   parallelizedfnc(x) 5.047008 5.207747 5.368486 5.514221 5.659956     3

Note that sum et al. are too fast to benefit from parallelization. Due to parallelization overhead the function takes even more time. I assume your real use case has less optimized functions.

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Thanks for you answer Roland. Anybody has the equivalent for Windows? Or even better, something that works on Mac OSX, Linux and Windows (cf my question)? –  user1134616 May 20 '13 at 17:36
1  
@user1134616, have you tried the above code on windows? It should work the same there. What problems are you having? –  Greg Snow May 20 '13 at 17:56
    
@GregSnow The documentation says that mclapply doesn't run in parallel on Windows. I guess, foreach with a backend that runs on all platforms could be used instead. –  Roland May 20 '13 at 19:58
    
@user1134616, OK, I think you can do essentially the same thing in a way that will work on windows by using parLapply instead of mclapply. You will need to create the cluster before calling, but it should run the functions in parallel. Creating the cluster is simple if you just want to use all the cores in a single machine, but rather complicated if you want to connect multiple windows machines together. –  Greg Snow May 20 '13 at 20:09
    
Thanks for the help everybody. @Greg I will give it a try –  user1134616 May 21 '13 at 6:54

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