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All,

The company where I work gave me this data to work with. In short, it's TSCS data with the firm as the cross-sectional unit with time units as fiscal years. Each firm has various accounts. I'm interested in creating a total of money spent on each account for a given firm.

I can provide a simple illustration of the data below. Let firm be the cross-sectional unit of interest. Each firm has various accounts on which the company spends money. Some accounts are common to all firms, others are unique. Not every firm had money spent on an account in a given year. In fact, some were not eligible for accounts until later on in the data, and others drop out (as such, the panel data can be considered unbalanced). As such, the NAs in the data I was provided could be treated as 0s, though it's a little bit problematic. Some firms are eligible in a given year but don't receive money in an account. Other firms are ineligible because of drop-out or late entry.

The data look like this, and it was given to me in wide format. It's a simplified version for illustration. In this illustration, firm=B wasn't eligible for an account in FY1990 and firm=C drops out in FY1992.

firm   account   FY1990 FY1991 FY1992
A     Account 1    500    900   1000
A     Account 2     30     40     40
A     Account 3     NA     60     20
A     Account 4     NA     35     NA
B     Account 1     NA    340     60
B     Account 2     NA    500    800
B     Account 3     NA    800     NA
B     Account 4     NA     60   1000
C     Account 1   1000    400     NA
C     Account 5    500     60     NA
C     Account 8     60   1000     NA
D     Account 1    400    400    400
D     Account 2     NA   1000   1000
D     Account 3    300     40    300
D     Account 6     NA    300    300
D     Account 7    900    900   1000
D     Account 8   1000   1200   1500

What I'd like to do (and was told to do) was amend this data so that it looks like this:

firm   account   FY1990 FY1991 FY1992
A     Account 1    500    900   1000
A     Account 2     30     40     40
A     Account 3     NA     60     20
A     Account 4     NA     35     NA
A      TOTAL       530   1035   1060
B     Account 1     NA    340     60
B     Account 2     NA    500    800
B     Account 3     NA    800     NA
B     Account 4     NA     60   1000
B      TOTAL        NA   1700   1860
C     Account 1   1000    400     NA
C     Account 5    500     60     NA
C     Account 8     60   1000     NA
C      TOTAL      1560   1460     NA
D     Account 1    400    400    400
D     Account 2     NA   1000   1000
D     Account 3    300     40    300
D     Account 6     NA    300    300
D     Account 7    900    900   1000
D     Account 8   1000   1200   1500
D      TOTAL      2600   3840   4500

I could just as easily do this in Excel or some other spreadsheet program, but that would be tedious and it invites more human error than if I were to use R to program this. I'm not against creating a new data frame with the totals rather than trying to add a row underneath all the accounts for a given firm. It might be easier to just put a 0 for the total for a given firm ineligible for an account in a given fiscal year. I can always recode some zeroes as NAs next and automate that process as well.

My assumption is this would require a loop, but I'm a novice in R programming. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Reproducible code for this illustration is below.

firm <- c("A","A","A","A","B","B","B","B","C","C","C","D","D","D","D","D","D")
account <- c("Account 1","Account 2","Account 3","Account 4","Account 1","Account 2","Account 3","Account 4","Account 1","Account 5","Account 8","Account 1","Account 2","Account 3","Account 6","Account 7","Account 8")
FY1990 <- c(500,30,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,1000,500,60,400,NA,300,NA,900,1000)
FY1991 <- c(900,40,60,35,340,500,800,60,400,60,1000,400,1000,40,300,900,1200)
FY1992 <- c(1000,40,20,NA,60,800,NA,1000,NA,NA,NA,400,1000,300,300,1000,1500)

Data=data.frame(firm=firm, account=account, FY1990=FY1990, FY1991=FY1991, FY1992=FY1992)
summary(Data)
Data
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2 Answers 2

Here's a data.table approach:

library(data.table)
dt <- data.table(Data)

dt[, rbind(.SD,
           c("TOTAL",
             lapply(.SD[, grepl("^FY[0-9]+", names(.SD)), with = F],
                    function(x){sum(x, na.rm = !all(is.na(x)))}
                   )),
           use.names = F),
     by = firm]

This works as follows: we iterate over firms (by = firm), and for each firm we stack (rbind)...

  • the subset of data associated with that firm (.SD) on top of
  • a vector starting with "TOTAL", with the rest created by that long lapply call.

The lapply operates only with the data associated with one firm at a time. This data is stored in a special temporary data.table, .SD, mentioned above. Column names can also be named directly (but are not in this example).

The lapply call works as follows: we iterate over a list of vectors (selected by choosing columns with names that pass our grepl regular expression test), and for each vector we apply a special variant of the sum function.

This variant on the sum function looks at the full vector x where, again -- this vector is chosen from the list we are iterating over and only has rows associated with one firm at a time -- and checks if there are any non-NA entries in x (that is, if !all(is.na(x))). If there are, those entries are summed treating any NAs as zero (since na.rm=TRUE); if not, it returns NA (since na.rm=FALSE and we have NAs).

For details on the na.rm argument, look at ?sum. Similarly, details on the functions above (grepl,lapply,...) can be found by searching with ?term or ?"term".

The by=firm option then stacks the firms' results and adds "firm" as the first column.

This is the result:

    firm   account FY1990 FY1991 FY1992
 1:    A Account 1    500    900   1000
 2:    A Account 2     30     40     40
 3:    A Account 3     NA     60     20
 4:    A Account 4     NA     35     NA
 5:    A     TOTAL    530   1035   1060
 6:    B Account 1     NA    340     60
 7:    B Account 2     NA    500    800
 8:    B Account 3     NA    800     NA
 9:    B Account 4     NA     60   1000
10:    B     TOTAL     NA   1700   1860
11:    C Account 1   1000    400     NA
12:    C Account 5    500     60     NA
13:    C Account 8     60   1000     NA
14:    C     TOTAL   1560   1460     NA
15:    D Account 1    400    400    400
16:    D Account 2     NA   1000   1000
17:    D Account 3    300     40    300
18:    D Account 6     NA    300    300
19:    D Account 7    900    900   1000
20:    D Account 8   1000   1200   1500
21:    D     TOTAL   2600   3840   4500
    firm   account FY1990 FY1991 FY1992

You will have to install and load the data.table package first.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 very nice approach –  Ricardo Saporta May 20 '13 at 18:30
    
I'd add "TOTAL"'s as you calculate them - right now accounts that are named e.g. "VerySpecialAccount10" would be sorted incorrectly –  eddi May 20 '13 at 18:39
    
another issue is your replacing 0's with NA's - what if you actually have a total equal to 0 –  eddi May 20 '13 at 18:42
    
@eddi Good point. I don't know how to add "TOTAL" rows as they are calculated. Alternately, one could prefix TOTAL with a character that comes very late in sorting, I guess. What do you think could be done to address the issue of erroneous NAs? –  Frank May 20 '13 at 18:47
2  
Frank, I'll edit your answer with those fixes. –  eddi May 20 '13 at 18:50

Just another option if you want to do it the data.frame way.

require(plyr)

sumNA <- function(x) ifelse(all(is.na(x)), NA, sum(x, na.rm = TRUE))

res <- rbind(Data,
             ddply(within(Data, account <- "TOTAL"), .(firm, account), 
                           numcolwise(sumNA))
             )


(res <- res[order(res$firm), ])

##    firm   account FY1990 FY1991 FY1992
## 1     A Account 1    500    900   1000
## 2     A Account 2     30     40     40
## 3     A Account 3     NA     60     20
## 4     A Account 4     NA     35     NA
## 18    A     TOTAL    530   1035   1060
## 5     B Account 1     NA    340     60
## 6     B Account 2     NA    500    800
## 7     B Account 3     NA    800     NA
## 8     B Account 4     NA     60   1000
## 19    B     TOTAL     NA   1700   1860
## 9     C Account 1   1000    400     NA
## 10    C Account 5    500     60     NA
## 11    C Account 8     60   1000     NA
## 20    C     TOTAL   1560   1460     NA
## 12    D Account 1    400    400    400
## 13    D Account 2     NA   1000   1000
## 14    D Account 3    300     40    300
## 15    D Account 6     NA    300    300
## 16    D Account 7    900    900   1000
## 17    D Account 8   1000   1200   1500
## 21    D     TOTAL   2600   3840   4500
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