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Click run a couple of times - these tests alternate between pass and fail.

http://jsfiddle.net/samselikoff/hhk6u/3/

Both tests require companies, but I don't know how to isolate the events. Any ideas?

Answer:

Jeferson is correct. One easy way to solve this, is to use events.once instead of events.on. This way you clean up your events from each test.

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cannot reproduce (gives OK every time). tested on chrome 26.0.1410.63 and firefox 21.0 –  akoskm May 21 '13 at 6:30
    
really? I get every other one passes/fails. I get the error: called start() while already started. The second test hears the event from both companies variables. Shouldn't the first one be destroyed though, after it falls out of scope? I feel like there's something fundamental I'm missing here. –  Sam Selikoff May 21 '13 at 6:33
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are running synchronous tests while the callbacks of the triggered events are asynchronous.

To fix that you have to implement an "asyncTest" and call the start function when the test assertions are ready to be collected.

Your second test was failing with the message:

Called start() while already started (QUnit.config.semaphore was 0 already)

teste Exactly because it was a synchronous test, already started and you were calling the start() method again.

And also in your first test, that doesn't specify a callback function, you have to wrap your async call in another function so you can call start() when the simulated AJAX call is ready.

I updated your JSFiddle with working code: http://jsfiddle.net/hhk6u/8/ The new code is:

QUnit.config.autostart = false;
QUnit.config.testTimeOut = 1000;

asyncTest('Some test that needs companies.', function() {
    function getCompanies() {
        var companies = new Companies();
        ok(1);
        start();
    }
    setTimeout(getCompanies, 500);
});

asyncTest('Some other async test that triggers a listener in companies.', function() {   
    var companies = new Companies();

    events.trigger("userSet:company", { name: "Acme", id: 1 });

    stop();
    events.on('fetched:departments', function(response) {
        console.log(response);
        deepEqual(response, [1, 2, 3]);
        start();
    });
});

Note that in the first test method I created a "getCompanies" function that will be called after an interval (500 milliseconds) that should be enough for the AJAX call to finish.

You have to adjust this time according to your needs, and also ajust "testTimeOut" value so your methods won't run indefinitely.

See QUnit config docs for more details: http://api.qunitjs.com/QUnit.config/

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But the first test wasn't an async test. Are you saying that if one of your tests is async, they all have to be? That can't be right. –  Sam Selikoff May 21 '13 at 13:16
    
I'm not saying that all tests should be async. No way! The fact is that the first one simulates an AJAX request, with a time out delay, so when you run the first test as a sync test it will finish before the function the call to "new Companies()" has finished. Then your second method will start and fail. The problem is not in the fact of having two test methods and one async. The problem is that both calls the same function, and this function is an async function. –  Jeferson Oliveira May 21 '13 at 13:20
    
I'm confused...new Companies() is an async function? It has a listener that responds with an async function, but why does it hear the event in the second test anyway? I figured it would be destroyed once it goes out of scope, after completion of the first test. –  Sam Selikoff May 21 '13 at 13:22
    
It would be async if you want to assure that the event triggering code would be executed before the test to finish, if not it won't. I updated the fiddle for calling it ignoring the event triggering: jsfiddle.net/hhk6u/10 –  Jeferson Oliveira May 21 '13 at 13:31
    
So it was just that I put test instead of asyncTest? [This part of the docs] (api.qunitjs.com/asyncTest) made me think I could call stop() manually. I can't believe that's all it was! I don't understand your comment - which event triggering code are you referring to? –  Sam Selikoff May 21 '13 at 13:44
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Isn't your initial Fiddle potentially failing because you are not creating your event bus at the start of each test (in a setup() method), so your asynchronous event from the first test could be fired when the 2nd test is running and then cause the 2nd test to handle it twice, calling start() twice.

See my updated Fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/e67Zh/ it creates the event bus each time.

You might want to also set a timeout in your qunit tests for scenarios where the event doesn't fire.

/* Backbone code
*******************/
var Company = Backbone.Model.extend({});

var Companies = Backbone.Collection.extend({

    initialize: function() {
        var self = this;

        events.on("userSet:company", function(company) {
            self.selectedCompany = company;

            // Simulate an AJAX request
            setTimeout(function() {
                events.trigger("fetched:departments", [1, 2, 3]);
            }, 500);
        });
    },

    selectedCompany: ''
});


/* Tests
*******************/

module("test with new event bus each time", {
    setup: function() {
        events = _.clone(Backbone.Events);
    }
});

test('Some test that needs companies.', function() {
    var companies = new Companies();
    ok(1);
});

test('Some other async test that triggers a listener in companies.', function() {   
    var companies = new Companies();

    events.trigger("userSet:company", { name: "Acme", id: 1 });

    stop();
    events.on('fetched:departments', function(response) {
        console.log(response);
        deepEqual(response, [1, 2, 3]);
        start();
    });
});
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Interesting, this is probably what I was missing here. I have since moved on to Jasmine, which makes it clear to me how to set up modules like this (i.e. using beforeEach). Thanks! –  Sam Selikoff Jun 7 '13 at 13:15
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