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What pattern would one use if you have multiple factory implementations, each of which requires different state information to create new objects?

Example: IModelParameters: contains all the inputs and outputs to a complex calculation IModelParameterFactory: has methods for getting and saving IModelParameter objects.

The issue is that one factory implementation might be getting your parameters from a database, with some state needed for retrieval, (i.e. a UserID), another might be getting your inputs from a file, in which case you don't have a UserID, but you do need a file name.

Is there another pattern that works better in this case? I've looked at some dependancy injection tools/libraries, and haven't seen anything that seems to address the situation.

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3 Answers 3

Have you tried to put the requeriments in a class?

Every factory implementation has their own requeriments, but all requeriments classes derives form a base requeriment class (Or impements a requeriments interface). This allows you to have the same interface for all factory implementations, you just must do a cast to the correct requeriments class in every factory implementation.

Yes, casts are ugly and error-prone, but this method provides an uniform an extensible interface for your factory.

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It's hard to say without seeing some code, but you may want to look into implementing a Repository Pattern. The Repository implementation would be responsible for retrieving the data that the factory then used to build its object(s). You could inject the repository interface into your factory:

public class ModelParameterFactory : IModelParameterFactory
{
    private readonly IModelParameterRepository Repository;

    public ModelParameterFactory(IModelParameterRepository repository)
    {
        Repository = repository;
    }

    ...interface methods use the injected repository...
}

Then you would have, say a DatabaseModelParameterRepository and a FileModelParameterRepository. But I'm guessing you also have logic around which of those you would need to inject, so that calls for another factory:

public class ModelParameterRepositoryFactory : IModelParameterRepositoryFactory
{
    public ModelParameterRepositoryFactory(...inputs needed to determine which repository to use...)
    {
        ...assign...
    }
    ...determine which repository is required and return it...
}

At this point, it might make more sense to inject IModelParameterRepositoryFactory into the ModelParameterFactory, rather than inject the IModelParameterRepository.

public class ModelParameterFactory : IModelParameterFactory
{
    private readonly IModelParameterRepositoryFactory RepositoryFactory;

    public ModelParameterFactory(IModelParameterRepositoryFactory repositoryFactory)
    {
        RepositoryFactory = repositoryFactory;
    }

    ...interface methods get repository from the factory...
}

Whether you use a DI container or not, all logic regarding which repository to use and which factory to use are now moved into the relevant factory implementations, as opposed to the calling code or DI configuration.

While not terribly complex, this design nonetheless does give me pause to wonder whether your ModelParameterFactory and ModelParameters are too generic. You might benefit from teasing them into separate, more specific classes. The result would be a simpler and more expressive design. The above should work for you if that is not the case, however.

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In my point of view, a state is something that you store in memory, such as static object, global variable, cache or session. Usually in DI, such states are not maintained, but being passed as a parameter. Example:

public IEnumerable<Records> GetRecordByUserId(string userId){ /*code*/ }

The userId is being passed instead being maintained in the repository.

However, when you want to make them as configuration-like instead of passing each time you do query, I think you can inject it as a wrapper class. See my question for more info. However, I don't recommend this design at repository, but I do recommend at service level.

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