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I am trying to understand multiprocessing in python.

I made a test program that finds the max number from a set of lists. It works fine for a limited number of processes, but at some point the program hangs if I increase the number to say 5000 processes.

Am I doing something wrong? Why does it hang if I increase the number of processes?

Here is my code:

from  multiprocessing import Process, Manager
import numpy.random as npyrnd

def getMaxRand(_num, shared_dict):
    '''
    create a list of random numbers
    picks max from list
    '''
    print 'starting process num:', _num
    rndList = npyrnd.random(size= 100)
    maxrnd = max(rndList)
    print 'ending process:', _num
    shared_dict[_num] = maxrnd



if __name__ == '__main__':
    processes = []
    manager = Manager()
    shared_dict= manager.dict()  
    for i in range(50): #hangs when this is increased to say 5000
        p = Process(target=getMaxRand, args=( i, shared_dict))
        processes.append(p)
    for p in processes:
        p.start()
    for p in processes:
        p.join()


    print shared_dict

EDIT:Having read some of the responses, Its clear that I can not just arbitrarily create many processes, and hope that multiprocessing library queues them for me. So a follow up question for me is how can I determine a max number of processes that i can run simultaneously?

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Any program will hang with that many processes, if you're using a regular, everyday PC. The only solution for that is using something with an obscene amount of cores, like Cuda. –  Renan May 20 '13 at 19:13
1  
Thanks for the comments, I guess I assumed that multiprocessing handles multiple processes and Queues them automatically. Looks like I need to manually manage and Quene my processes. –  adi May 20 '13 at 19:30
3  
@adi, if the work for each process is cpu-bound, you basically won't do better than the number of cores, i.e. multiprocessing.cpu_count(). –  Kylo May 20 '13 at 19:52
1  
What OS are you using? There's a pretty big difference in how multiprocessing works between Windows and Unix-like systems (in terms of overhead and limits on various solutions). There can also be system-dependent limits on things like the number of processes you can spawn. Also, your Pool solution doesn't actually create 5000 processes, just 8. It simply reuses those processes to do 5000 jobs (queuing the ones it hasn't got to yet). This distinction may or may not matter to you. –  Blckknght May 20 '13 at 20:25
1  
@Blckknght Im using windows 7, on a 8 core machine. I could have used multiprocessing.cpu_count(). Also It looks like re-using processes is much faster than creating new processes. –  adi May 20 '13 at 20:28

1 Answer 1

I managed to overcome the large number of processes hanging my PC. It appears to be working for a fairly large number of processes (I tested upto 50000)

This is how i approached the problem:

from  multiprocessing import  Pool
import numpy.random as npyrnd


full_result = {}

def getMaxRand(_num):
    '''
    create a list of random numbers
    picks max from list
    '''
    print 'starting process num:', _num
    rndList = npyrnd.random(size= 100)
    maxrnd = max(rndList)
    print 'ending process:', _num

    return (_num, maxrnd)

def accumulateResults(result):
    print 'getting result' , result
    full_result[result[0]] = result[1]

def doProcesses():
    pool = Pool(processes=8)    
    for i in range(5000): #if I increase this number will it crash?
        pool.apply_async(getMaxRand, args=( i, ), callback=accumulateResults)
    pool.close()
    pool.join()



if __name__ == '__main__':
    doProcesses()
    print 'FINAL:', full_result

Thanks @mgilson and @Kylo for pointing me in this direction.

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