Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This question already has an answer here:

I have a JAVA string that is being used to validate proper email addresses.

^[\\w'-]+(\\.[\\w'-]+)*@[A-Za-z0-9]+([.-][A-Za-z0-9]+)*(\\.[A-Za-z]{2,})$

I want to user to be able to leave the address blank and not get an error message. How is this possible?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Fredrik Pihl, qJake, HamZa, Sean Vieira, Shankar Damodaran Mar 4 '14 at 4:34

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

    
Just make a condition for that. Its easier than reconfiguring the whole regular expression. – Havenard May 20 '13 at 19:24
    
What programming language are you using? There may be a better solution than regex. Email addresses aren't easy to parse using a regex, but many languages have fairly standard functions for validating email addresses. For example, in PHP, you can simply use filter_var(); no regex required. – Spudley May 20 '13 at 19:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since you didn't provide any other code or specify what language you were using, the best I can suggest is:

(?:^[\\w'-]+(\\.[\\w'-]+)*@[A-Za-z0-9]+([.-][A-Za-z0-9]+)*(\\.[A-Za-z]{2,})$)|(?:^$)

Which will match an e-mail or an empty string.

share|improve this answer
2  
This will only match email adresses not containing non-english characters – migg May 20 '13 at 19:35
    
@migg This was the OP's regex, not mine. I just added the check for the empty string. – qJake May 20 '13 at 19:37
    
Sorry about that, new to the forum. Using Java – koddos May 20 '13 at 19:57

If you have an expression you want to make optional allowing empty string to match you could use any of the following:

^(?:regex)?\z
^\z|^regex\z
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.