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I want to create a new database on an Oracle server via JDBC. I cannot seem to connect to the database without providing an SID: using a URL like jdbc:oracle:thin:@//[IP]:1521 results in an error of "ORA-12504, TNS:listener was not given the SID in CONNECT_DATA"

Alternatively, if I log into a specific SID, I can run most DDL commands except for CREATE DATABASE foo which fails with an error of "ORA-01100: database already mounted"

How am I supposed to create a database if I cannot connect to the server without specifying a specific database and cannot create a database if I am already logged into a specific database?

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Are you really sure that you want to create a database? What other RDBMS products call a "database" is generally similar to what Oracle calls a "schema" (or, depending on context, a "tablespace"). There is generally only one database on a server, that database houses many different schemas which are collections of database objects. –  Justin Cave May 20 '13 at 19:50

2 Answers 2

What you need are following commands:

  • CREATE TABLESPACE
  • CREATE USER
  • and few GRANT ... TO ... -- to have rights to connect and create objects, at least

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    AFAIK creating a database needs an internal and direct connection which can only be done by logging in directly on the server (normally a user account called 'oracle').

    One reason for that: users are stored in the database itself. No database = no user to connect to by an external client.

    Please also note Justin's comment about oracles database schemas. This is probably what you are looking for

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    Wrong. With static service registration in listener.ora, and REMOTE_LOGIN_PASSWORDFILE initialization parameter value set to either SHARED or EXCLUSIVE, the remote connection to an idle instance is possible, provided that the password for the user with SYSDBA privilege exists in the password file. –  Yasir Arsanukaev May 20 '13 at 21:19
        
    Wow, didn't know that. I think that's not a very common usecase... –  Daniel Alder May 20 '13 at 22:51

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