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My application currently takes a string read by a barcode scanner, and performs a task depending on the format of the barcode string. Essentially, the barcode string is passed to a web service method, which parses the string into its component parts and sets parameters for a call to a stored procedure.

The format of the barcode is slightly different depending on what the barcode represents. For example:

B-120523-001 

is a "container" barcode (one character building id)-(container sequence #)-(3 digit container number)

555555-00001  

is a "label" barcode (order #)-(five digit label number)

Right now there is a lot of repeated code because the barcode parsing is essentially done the same way. For example, every web service method that handles a container barcode uses the same parsing methods. It's basically done by using substrings and the position of the hyphen character.

public int ContainerMethod1(string barcode)
{
  int errCode;
  int dash1 = -1;
  int dash2 = -1;

  string cont_building;
  string cont_sequence;
  string cont_number;

  //method that locates the string positions of the hyphens

  LocateDash(barcode, ref dash1, ref dash2);

  //this method uses the position of the hypens to parse the 
  //barcode substrings and return the data the barcode represents
  //in this case a container barcode ("B-120523-001") is passed in
  //and the building/sequence/number variables values are set.

  errCode = ContBarcode(barcode, dash1, dash2, ref cont_building, 
                        ref cont_sequence, ref cont_number);


  if (errCode ==0)
  {
    //execute a stored procedure that takes
    //cont_building, cont_sequence, cont_number as parameters
  }



}

This works fine, but would it be better to refactor and create classes based on each barcode type? Doing some reading it seems as if the factory method pattern is close to what I'm thinking of. Essentially a class that accepts the barcode string, and based on what it parses out, creates and returns a barcode object with its own properties. Something like:

 public class BarcodeReader
 {
   public Barcode Read(string barcode)
   {
     ParseTheBarcodeStringHere

     if (the barcode string matches the rules for a container barcode)
     {
       //instantiate ContainerBarcode object, set the properties based
       //on what's in the barcode string, return ContainerBarcode
     }
     else
     {
       //instantiate a LabelBarcode object, set its properties,
       //return LabelBarcode
     } 

   }


 public class ContainerBarcode : Barcode
 {
   public string Building {get; set;}
   public string Sequence {get; set;}
   public string Number {get; set;}
 }

 public class LabelBarcode: Barcode
 {
  public string OrderNumber {get; set;}
  public string LabelNumber {get; set;}
 }

 ...

 public int ContainerMethod1(string barcode)
 {
   BarcodeReader reader = new BarcodeReader();
   ContainerBarcode contBarcode = reader.Read(barcode)

   //assuming barcode="B-120523-001", the properties at this point should be
   //contBarcode.Building == "B"
   //contBarcode.Sequence == "120523"
   //contBarcode.Number == "001"
 }
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3  
Maybe a code review question? –  Jeremy Holovacs May 20 '13 at 19:51
1  
Sounds like a good place to start. I would also refactor the parsing logic out of the Barcode Read method into a dependency, just in case parsing logic will evolve in the future. –  Roman May 20 '13 at 19:55
1  
When you say it's repetitive, do you mean that code has been copied into many different files? In that case, yes, you should make a library and everyone should use that. However, unless you're just looking for work to do, I don't think it's wise to take a working system and change the architecture - even if the current architecture is stupid, unless you have a compelling reason to do so, like you've been asked to re-write the app, or you have a project to accept some new types of bar codes. –  Jasmine May 20 '13 at 20:08
    
App was written by others and now I'm maintaining it and also adding new features. Just looking for opportunities to improve it a little at a time. Plus, you're right, I'm adding new types of barcodes and want to set up a generic way to handle them, which is what prompted me to consider this. –  spurro May 20 '13 at 21:10
    
Also by repetitive I mean repetitive within the three web service projects that handle barcodes. Each web service has maybe a dozen or so methods, and all of them handle barcodes in some way –  spurro May 20 '13 at 21:22
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need an abstract BarCodeProcessor class that has the responsibility to

  • know about the parts of a particular type of bar code
  • know how to validate that particular type of bar code
  • know how to execute a command against a bar code of that particular type

Each concrete implementation of the abstract BarCodeProcessor class, has the responsibility to

  • provide an actual implementation for each of the parent classes responsibilities.
  • provide access to the results (if any) from executing the associated command.

Now need an instance of a factory class (BarCodeProcessorFactory?), who's responsibilities are to

  • Parse bar codes into their constituent components,
  • Know about the concrete implementations of the abstract BarCodeProcessor class
  • Accept a bar code, parse it and then construct and return the appropriate concrete BarCodeProcessor to the caller.

Once you have that, your web service needs an instance of the factory class. On receipt of a bar code, it should invoke the factory class to get an appropriate concrete instance of a BarCodeProcessor. Having that, it needs to invoke the processor's Validate() and Execute() methods. Finally, communicate the results of executing the request back to the caller.

Now, adding a new type of bar code consists of creating a relatively straightforward concrete implementation of a BarcodeProcessor, and adding an entry to a table in the factory class, consisting of a parse routine and the type of the associated concrete BarCodeProcessor.

The easy way to do the parsing would be to have the factory class have a table relating a regular expression to parse the bar code to the associated type. When called to do work, the factory method iterates over the table, looking for the first successful match (you might want to throw an exception if collisions occur).

Even better, maintain the regex/type information in your config file: that way you could add new bar codes without rebuilding your service: drop an assembly in the extensions directory, add a entry to the config file and you're done.

You might want to look at the Command Pattern to add more flexibility:

The Command Pattern encapsulates a request as an object, thereby letting you parameterize other objects with different requests, queue or log requests, and support undoable operations.

command pattern class diagram

share|improve this answer
    
Nicholas, thanks for this - I've got a few questions that I've posted below –  spurro May 21 '13 at 16:31
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This is a good start, however the main gain would come from implementing a Process() method on your barcode objects. It would call the stored procedure associated with the barcode data. Something like this:

public interface IBarcodeProcessor {
    void Process();
}

Your main method would get really simple:

public void ProcessBarcode(string barcodeString){
    IBarcodeProcessor barcodeProcessor = BarcodeReader.Read(barcodeString);
    barcodeProcessor.Process();
}

Your label barcode processor might look like this:

 public class LabelBarcode: IBarcodeProcessor
 {
  public string OrderNumber {get; set;}
  public string LabelNumber {get; set;}

  public void Process(){
     CallProcedure("ProcessLabel", OrderNumber, LabelNumber);
  }

 }

Note: I am using your BarcodeReader here, that's perfectly fine, just expanding on it.

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1  
I like the simplicity of it, thanks I will give it a shot –  spurro May 21 '13 at 16:38
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Create an abstract base class, put there the common logic of all parsers. Add an abstract method of CanParse(value) that will tell if this parser knows the given barcode.

Use a factory to register them dynamicly and when parsing get the list of all of them, run on that list until you find one that can parse the value.

Update

In regards to the common logic in the base abstract class, check the Template pattern, It might fit you.

share|improve this answer
    
will check out Template pattern thanks –  spurro May 21 '13 at 16:38
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Nicholas, I have written up some pseudocode according to your guidance. It is incomplete and I think there are a few points where I don't understand completely. For example, you mention the concrete BarCodeProcessor implementations having a Validate() method. I'm making the assumption this is where the matching of the barcode to a specific format would take place. But you mention the BarCodeProcessorFactory would actually be doing the matching according to a format ?

public abstract class BarCodeProcessor
{
    public abstract bool Validate();
    public abstract void Execute();
}

public class LabelBarCodeProcessor : BarCodeProcessor
{
    public string SalesNum { get; set; }
    public string LabelNum { get; set; }
    public string Barcode { get; private set; }
    public int FirstDashPos { get; private set; }

    public LabelBarCodeProcessor(string barcode)
    {        
        this.Barcode = barcode;
        this.FirstDashPos = -1;
    }
    public override bool Validate()
    {
        bool isValid = false;
        LocateDashPos();

        // if barcode matches the format 999999-1111
        if (this.Barcode.Length >= 10 &&
            this.Barcode.Length <= 16 &&
            this.FirstDashPos >= 5 &&
            this.FirstDashPos <= 10)
        {
            isValid = true;
        }
        return isValid;
    }

    public override void Execute()
    {
        int i;
        // parse out the component parts of the label barcode
        SalesNum = Barcode.Substring(0, FirstDashPos);

        if ((Barcode.Length - FirstDashPos) == 6 &&
            int.TryParse(Barcode.Substring(FirstDashPos + 1, 5), out i))
        {
            LabelNum = Barcode.Substring(FirstDashPos + 1, 5);                
        }
        else if ((Barcode.Length - FirstDashPos) == 5 &&
            int.TryParse(Barcode.Substring(FirstDashPos + 1, 4), out i))
        {
            LabelNum = Barcode.Substring(FirstDashPos + 1, 4);
        }
    }

    private void LocateDashPos()
    {
        FirstDashPos = Barcode.IndexOf("-");
    }

}

public class ContainerBarCodeProcessor: BarCodeProcessor
{
    public string ContainerBuilding { get; set; }
    public string ContainerSequence { get; set; }
    public string ContainerNumber { get; set; }
    public string Barcode { get; private set; }
    public int FirstDashPos { get; private set; }
    public int LastDashPos { get; private set; }

    public ContainerBarCodeProcessor(string barcode)
    {
        Barcode = barcode;
        FirstDashPos = -1;
        LastDashPos = -1;
    }

    public override bool Validate()
    {
        int i, j;
        bool isValid = false;

        LocateDashPos();

        // if barcode matches the format A-999999-111
        if (Barcode.Length == 12 &&
            FirstDashPos == 1 &&
            LastDashPos == 8 &&
            int.TryParse(Barcode.Substring(FirstDashPos + 1, 6), out i) &&
            int.TryParse(Barcode.Substring(LastDashPos + 1, 3), out j))
        {
            isValid = true;
        }
        return isValid;
    }

    public override void Execute()
    {
        ContainerBuilding = Barcode.Substring(0, 1);
        ContainerSequence = Barcode.Substring(FirstDashPos + 1, 6);
        ContainerNumber = Barcode.Substring(LastDashPos + 1, 3);
    }

    private void LocateDashPos()
    {
        FirstDashPos = Barcode.IndexOf("-");
        if (FirstDashPos >= 0 && FirstDashPos < (Barcode.Length - 1))
        {
            LastDashPos = Barcode.IndexOf("-", FirstDashPos + 1);
        }
    }
}

public class BarCodeProcessorFactory
{
    public BarCodeProcessor GetProcessor(string barcode)
    {
        BarCodeProcessor barCodeProcessor;
        // match the barcode with regex and do the parsing here?
        // ex: if barcode matches containerBarcodeRegex then barCodeProcessor = new ContainerBarCodeProcessor(barcode)
        // if barcode matches labelBarcodeRegex then barCodeProcessor = new LabelBarCodeProcessor(barcode)
        return barCodeProcessor;

    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The parser breaks down bar codes according to their lexical structure into their constituent components. It doesn't know anything about the semantic meaning of the constituent parts. Is each constituent part valid within its individual domain? Is each part valid with respect to the values of the other parts? That's the job of the processor and its validation method. –  Nicholas Carey May 21 '13 at 17:26
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