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I have two vectors:

a = [1 3 5 7 9];
b = [2 4 6 8 10];

That I need to combine together element wise. Meaning that I need the first element of vector a, then the first element of vector b, second of a, second of b, and so forth until I get the following:

combined = [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10]

How do I do this within MatLab?

Edit

I ran a test of the top three answers (Josh, Marc, & Kronos) and compared the time it took to run them. I ran each 100 times after doing a 10 iteration warmup. The vectors created were exactly the same size in length (16e+6) and were random values ranging from 1 to 100:

Test Results
Test:           Total Time (100 runs):      Avg Time Per Exec:
Josh B          21.3687                     0.2137
Marc C          21.4273                     0.2143
Kronos          31.1897                     0.3119

It appears that both Josh's and Marc's solutions are similar in execution time.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted
a = [1 3 5 7 9];
b = [2 4 6 8 10];
temp = [a; b];
combined = temp(:)';
share|improve this answer
    
You should just use [a,b] instead of [a;b] followed by the transpose. – David K May 20 '13 at 20:33
    
and it seems this won't work if a and b don't have exactly the same size. – fpe May 20 '13 at 20:39
1  
If you mean use [a b] instead of [a; b] and then drop the transpose on temp(:), then that doesn't look right to me. – Joshua Barr May 20 '13 at 20:42
    
@fpe The problem definition makes no sense unless they have exactly the same size, except for maybe a size difference of +/- 1 – Joshua Barr May 20 '13 at 20:43
    
I'm accepting yours as it's a bit easier to read and has the same execution time as @Marc's. – KronoS May 20 '13 at 22:12

This can be done by the following:

a = [1 3 5 7 9];
b = [2 4 6 8 10];
combinedSize = size(a, 2) * 2;

combined(1:2:combinedSize) = a;
combined(2:2:combinedSize) = b;

This is obviously assuming that your vectors are exactly the same size. If by chance you want to merge two vectors that are not the same size then you can do the following:

combinedSize = max(size(a, 2), size(b, 2)) * 2;
combined = NaN(1,combinedSize);
combined(1:2:size(a,2)*2) = a;
combined(2:2:size(b,2)*2) = b;

This will place a NaN for the remaining elements of the smaller vector. For example, given the following sample vectors:

a = [1 3 5 7 9 11];
b = [2 4 6 8];

will result in the combined vector:

combined =

     1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9   NaN    11   NaN
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't you ask the question? – Roney Michael May 21 '13 at 5:01
    
Despite being slower, I think this is probably the best solution, since it is the clearest. – Joshua Barr May 21 '13 at 6:23
1  
@RoneyMichael I did but after asking the question it turned into a 'rubber ducky' programming moment. I figured out the solution after asking the question and wanted to share my findings. – KronoS May 21 '13 at 13:01
    
Perhaps you can make it work for arbitrary pairs by initializing to zero or NaN and giving it the size of the largest array – Ivo Flipse May 21 '13 at 14:51
    
@IvoFlipse I updated the answer. – KronoS May 21 '13 at 16:34

Place the vectors below eachother in a matrix and use reshape. For example:

>> A=[1 2 3]

A =

     1     2     3

>> B=[4 5 6]

B =

     4     5     6

>> C=reshape([A;B],1,size(A,2)+size(B,2))

C =

     1     4     2     5     3     6

It's straightforward to generalize to more than 2 vectors.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, will this work for vectors that aren't the same size? – KronoS May 20 '13 at 20:11
    
No, you will not be able to concatenate them into a matrix. Maybe you can get it to work with some repmat magic, though ... – Marc Claesen May 20 '13 at 20:12
    
I don't need to in this case, but was curious in case someone else coming along might want to know. – KronoS May 20 '13 at 20:13
1  
@KronoS If the vectors weren't the same length, then what you asked for wouldn't make sense. – Joshua Barr May 20 '13 at 20:17

You can also give a try to looping, for example:

a=[1 2 3 4 5];
b=[11 12 13 14 15];

for i = 1:N

{

if (i%2==0)
{ c[i] = b[i]; }
else
{ c[i] = a[i]; }

This shall work!

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this is that I have vector that can be up to 16 mil+ long. Dealing with loops then take forever and matlab is optimized for dealing with whole matrices or vectors. – KronoS May 21 '13 at 13:02

All the answers above only work if the two vectors have the same number of elements. The following will work even if they have different number of elements:

>> 
A = [1 3 5];
B = [2 4 6 7 8];
C = [1 3 5 7 8];
D = [2 4 6];

AB = nan(1,2*max(numel(A),numel(B)));
CD = nan(1,2*max(numel(C),numel(D)));

AB(2*(1:length(A))) = A;
AB(1+2*(1:length(B))) = B;
CD(2*(1:length(C))) = C;
CD(1+2*(1:length(D))) = D;
>> 
AB = AB(~isnan(AB))
CD = CD(~isnan(CD))

The result would be:

AB =

     1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8


CD =

     1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8
share|improve this answer
    
This makes an assumption about how he/she wants to treat this case (i.e. that after one vector runs out of elements, the result should just be built by taking elements in order from the other). – Joshua Barr May 21 '13 at 6:17
    
@JoshuaBarr: Wouldn't that be the intuitive way? Besides, this will work when the number of elements are equal as well. – Roney Michael May 21 '13 at 6:43
    
This solution makes an assumption, that's all I'm saying. I usually prefer code that fails fast and hard when an unexpected condition arises. – Joshua Barr May 21 '13 at 15:52

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