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I'm trying to create a Windows 8, 32-bit program for testing. Testing includes a large allocation, and I'm having trouble. The OS was booted with /3GB, the machine has 8GB and a page file, and the program was linked with /LARGEADDRESSAWARE, so I should not be memory constrained. (Its important for me to use a 32-bit program for testing because of the way some types are defined - for example, a size_t).

The trouble is I'm not able to allocate 2GB (0x80000000) of memory from new or VirtualAlloc. new throws bad_alloc and VirtualAlloc returns NULL with ERROR_NOT_ENOUGH_MEMORY.

In previous versions of Windows, a 3GB Address Space meant the application was given 0x00000000 to 0xBFFFFFFF, and the OS used 0xC0000000 to 0xFFFFFFFF (see Richter's Programming Applications for Windows or Solomon and Russinovich's Windows Internals). In principal, I believe that means I have the theoretical space.

If I switch to x64, everything works as expected. I suspect I'm missing something very obvious, but I'm not sure what (like a shared memory region right in the middle of the address space).

Are there any ideas how I might be able to perform an allocation of 0x80000000 on a 32-bit machine?

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There is also address space fragmentation that will limit your ability to allocate a 2GB chunk. Remember that even a minimal program will need a few dlls and these will occupy your applications address space not the kernel portion. –  drescherjm May 20 '13 at 20:33
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Without the LAA flag, an application is only allowed 2GB of space, and as @drescherjm noted, the application itself uses some of that. –  ssube May 20 '13 at 20:34
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Myth: The /3GB switch lets me map one giant 3GB block of memory. "The holes near the 2GB boundary prevent you from getting even 2GB of contiguous address space." –  Raymond Chen May 20 '13 at 21:52
    
Out of curiosity, you are allocating 2GB just to probe if the process has increased address space (over 2GB), or you really need the huge piece that large? –  Roman R. May 20 '13 at 22:28
    
@RomanR. I actually plan on hashing the zero'd memory in one swoop using a number of cryptographic libraries. I want to see which produce incorrect results due to sloppy programming. (I was recently in a conversation where it was argued overflow and illegal shifts due to the C/C++ standard were not applicable). If I break it up, I believe I will taint the results. –  jww May 21 '13 at 0:15
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2 Answers

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In previous versions of Windows, a 3GB Address Space meant the application was given 0x00000000 to 0xBFFFFFFF, and the OS used 0xC0000000 to 0xFFFFFFFF (see Richter's Programming Applications for Windows or Solomon and Russinovich's Windows Internals). In principal, I believe that means I have the theoretical space.

Nothing has changed in Windows 8. What you stated is still true. In order, on a 32 bit system, to be able to reserve a 2GB block of memory you need at least the following to be true:

  1. Your process is large address aware.
  2. Your system is booted with the /3GB switch.
  3. The virtual address space of your process has an unreserved range of addresses that is 2GB in size.

It's easy enough to arrange for the first two conditions to hold, but the third condition is harder to control. You should not assume that your process will be able to find a 2GB contiguous range of address space in a 32 bit process. That's an unrealistic expectation.

If your test system is a 64 bit system then you should consider testing on 32 bit system also. For example, on a 64 bit system there is no /3GB boot option and all large address aware 32 bit processes have a 4GB address space. Of course, you are still subject to item 3 on my list.

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Is rebasing dlls (so to make a larger contiguous address space) still possible with windows8. Or does the OS prevent that? I used to rebase my dlls a decade ago when I needed to load my medical images (very close to 2GB per case) in a single process on a 32bit windows machine. –  drescherjm May 20 '13 at 20:56
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@drescherjm You can still rebase DLLs. Although since Vista, ASLR obstructs. –  David Heffernan May 20 '13 at 20:58
    
@DavidHeffernan - Is it possible to get something that large and contiguous from the page file, and let the memory manger swap in pages as needed? Since this is a test program, I don't care that I thrash things. –  jww May 21 '13 at 0:22
    
@drescherjm Rebasing won't help. There is a permanently invalid 64KB region near the 2GB boundary that will never go away. –  Raymond Chen May 21 '13 at 0:29
    
@RaymondChen - its interesting that neither Richter nor Russinovich/Solomon mention that region (unless I missed it). For Inside Windows, the 2GB area is detailed in Table 7-6 around page 420. But there is no detail of the 3GB area. –  jww May 21 '13 at 0:59
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The /3GB option has no meaning on a 64-bit operating system and is no longer supported on Vista and up. The option is IncreaseUserVA on modern 32-bit versions of Windows that use BCDEdit, like Windows 8. So it is very unlikely that you actually got what you hoped for, in all likelihood you actually got a 2 GB address space. Which is the quickest explanation for why you can't allocate 2 GB.

A 32-bit process gets a 4 GB address space on a 64-bit operating system since none of the upper pages are needed by the operating system. You have to opt-in though by telling the operating system that you don't use unwise pointer shenanigans like relying on the upper bit of an address to be zero, the /LARGEADDRESSAWARE link.exe or editbin.exe option is required.

That still doesn't mean you get to allocate 4 GB, and the same problem you have now with the 2 GB address space you currently get. The address space is shared between code and data. It takes just one DLL with an awkward base address to cut the available space in two.

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side note: Doing a VirtualAlloc with MEM_TOP_DOWN on can quickly tell whether the issue is max VA (/3gb etc) or just lack of contiguous room to allocate 3GB. –  Remus Rusanu May 20 '13 at 21:47
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