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C11 standard says the following (6.2.4p2):

The lifetime of an object is the portion of program execution during which storage is guaranteed to be reserved for it. An object exists, has a constant address, and retains its last-stored value throughout its lifetime. If an object is referred to outside of its lifetime, the behavior is undefined. The value of a pointer becomes indeterminate when the object it points to (or just past) reaches the end of its lifetime.

The definition of an indeterminate value is (3.19.2):

either an unspecified value or a trap representation

I'm having a bit of a problem with this restriction. I find that if copying intedeterminate pointers was acceptable, a small optimization of the doubly-linked list would be possible. The optimization relies on the following invariants:

  • The prev pointer of the head element in the list is indeterminate.
  • For double-ended lists, the tail pointer of an empty list is indeterminate.

Everything else is the same as for normal doubly linked lists. With these invariants, the operations of inserting to the front and removing from the front can be sligthly optimized. In particular (code is for single-ended list only):

insertToFront(e)
{
    e->next = head;
    e->prev = NULL;
    if (head) {
        head->prev = e;
    }
    head = e;
}

insertToFrontOptimized(e)
{
    e->next = head;
    if (head) {
        head->prev = e;
    }
    head = e;
}

removeFront()
{
    head = head->next;
    if (head) {
        head->prev = NULL;
    }
}

removeFrontOptimized()
{
    head = head->next;
}

Other operations can still work. For example:

remove(e)
{
    if (e != head) {
        e->prev->next = e->next;
    } else {
        head = e->next;
    }

    if (e->next) {
        e->next->prev = e->prev; // problem here
    }
}

The line above is problematic because when removing the head element, it will set the prev pointer of the new head to an indeterminate value. For example, the new prev pointer could be a copy of an uninitialized pointer after an insertToFrontOptimized(), or it could point to a freed element after a removeFrontOptimized().

But this is only problematic in terms of the C language; the list invariants are not broken because the prev pointer of the new head element is allowed to have an indeterminate value.

Does the restriction on the use of indeterminate pointers prevent this optimization? Is there a way around?

share|improve this question
    
But what's the problem with head->prev pointing to garbage? You will never read head->prev, you would only ever write to it. –  Porkbutts May 20 '13 at 21:00
    
The problem is that remove() of a first element would read head->prev and set the ->prev of the new head to that value. Adding a check to only do that when it's not removing the first element will reduce performance. –  Ambroz Bizjak May 20 '13 at 21:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why do you need to touch undefined pointer? Consider this variant:

remove(e)
{
    if (e != head) {
        e->prev->next = e->next;
        if (e->next) {
            e->next->prev = e->prev; // NO problem here
        }
    } else {
        head = e->next;
        // OK, new head->prev is undefined now. Who cares?
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's what I did for my code, and the other operations could be fixed like that too without extra branches. How obvious :) –  Ambroz Bizjak May 22 '13 at 22:25

If I understand correctly, you are worried about the line

e->next->prev = e->prev; // problem here

invoking undefined behavior because e->prev can be indeterminate at a time when it is executed.

It is probably good to worry about this, even if your architecture does not have trap representations. C compilers have a tendency to treat access to indeterminate objects as undefined behavior, even if the recent standards seem more nuanced than that.

If I were you I would reassure myself by using this line in substitution:

memcpy(&e->next->prev, &e->prev, sizeof(e->prev);

It will probably be compiled to the same instruction(s) you would have expected for the original assignment. The only drawback is that according to memcpy()'s specification, &e->next->prev and &e->prev must be distinct when the call is made, whereas the assignment e->next->prev = e->prev; allows them to overlap exactly.

This said, this is one question that it would really help to have a formal semantic of C to answer, and the formal semantics I know of (KCC, CompCert, …) would all allow you to copy an indeterminate variable over another of the exact same type.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info. Anyway I think wrapping the pointers in structures will work too (and maybe a bit more elegant and without relying on memcpy optimization), because structures are guaranteed to not have trap representations. Sorry, I was forced to accept Roman's answer since that is how I fixed my problem ;) –  Ambroz Bizjak May 22 '13 at 22:28

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