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I'm migrating a database model where I have to change a 1:n relation to a n:m relation.

I need to INSERT the data into the new table and use the ID that is generated in the process to fill the join table.

The tables are called Parts and Document and the join table between them called PartDocument.

Now I want to create two unique documents (with default types/names/descriptions) for each part, and link them to the corresponding part via the join table. I can create the 2*N documents easily, but I'm having difficulty figuring out how I would link each one to the PartDocument join table.

INSERT INTO Document (Type, Name, Description)
SELECT 1, 'Work Instructions', 'Work Instructions'
FROM Parts
GO

INSERT INTO Document (Type, Name, Description)
SELECT 2, 'Drawing', 'Drawing'
FROM Parts
GO

INSERT INTO PartDocument (PartID, DocumentID)
?????

My PartDocument join table just has two columns, PartID and DocumentID, which are used together as a composite key.

My desired result is that I will have two documents for each part, and they will each be linked with a corresponding part via the join table.

I'm using SQL Server Express 2012. http://sqlfiddle.com/#!6/b51f0

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What I ended up doing was adding a temporary PartID column when I created the Document table. Then I could drop this column after I created and linked the Documents.

So basically this:

INSERT INTO Document (Type, Name, Description, PartID)
SELECT 1, 'Work Instructions', 'Work Instructions', Part.ID
FROM Part
GO

INSERT INTO PartDocument
SELECT Document.PartID, Document.ID
FROM Document
GO

ALTER TABLE Document
DROP COLUMN PartID
GO
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you should mark the answer as correct (with the hook below the numbers). –  Angelo Neuschitzer May 21 '13 at 8:10
    
@Angelo Neuschitzer It makes me wait to answer my own question and then longer to accept. XD Thanks for the help btw. :) –  hashtable May 21 '13 at 18:04
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INSERT INTO Document (Type, Name, Description)
SELECT 1, 'Work Instructions', 'Work Instructions'
FROM Parts
GO

INSERT INTO Document (Type, Name, Description)
SELECT 2, 'Drawing', 'Drawing'
FROM Parts
GO

INSERT INTO PartDocument (PartID, DocumentID)
SELECT part.id, document.id
FROM Parts part
INNER JOIN Document document ON part.field1 = document.field1
GO

The complex element is the ON part in the INNER JOIN in the last selection. You have to select the lines that you have just created together with the parts elements that they came from.

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The INSERT SELECT is creating 1 document for every part. So after I run both inserts, I have twice as many documents total as parts. The document IDs are autogenerated, and I don't know the PartIDs. They're being drawn from the database. I don't think this is quite doing what I'm looking for. xD –  hashtable May 20 '13 at 22:19
    
@hashtable If you want that, than you should not have a cross join table. It would be better to have the PartID in your document. (Or can a document be connected to more than one Part?) –  Angelo Neuschitzer May 20 '13 at 22:27
    
Documents can be connected to more than one part in the new version of the database. (In the old version, it couldn't). This is part of my script to reformat and migrate the old data to the new database model. After I get these linked, I'm going to be creating DocumentVersions that point to these "Document" placeholders. So yes, I want a join table. xD –  hashtable May 20 '13 at 22:38
    
@hashtable Okay, so you will have to use more complex and database specific solutions (like triggers, updateable views or similar). What Database are you using and is it possible to use a programming language here (and which one?) –  Angelo Neuschitzer May 20 '13 at 22:40
    
@hashtable Also, I changed my answer to a new approach that might work, but for that I would need more data about your setting. Have you considered setting up a SQLFiddle to demonstrate it? –  Angelo Neuschitzer May 20 '13 at 22:45
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