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I am trying to run the php script (below) named daemon.php as a back ground process using unix.

#!/usr/bin/php
<?php
$count = 0;
while(true){
    $count = $count + 1;
    file_put_contents('daemon1.log', $count, FILE_APPEND);
    sleep(1);  
}
?>

If I run it in the foreground using the command below

php daemon.php

The file deamon1.log starts getting written to. Also if I enter the command:

ps | grep php

I get the out put

10573 ttys000    0:00.20 php daemon.php

If I try to run it as a background process using the command

php daemon.php &

I get the console out put

[1] 10584

And the command

ps | grep php

Returns

10584 ttys000    0:00.02 php daemon.php

But nothing is written to deamon1.log. Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
What version of Unix are you using? I'm running it here under GNU/Linux Debian without any problems. – Bjoern Rennhak May 20 '13 at 22:44
1  
i suspect an issue with the user and file writing permissions. the cli user and apache user will not be the same – Dagon May 20 '13 at 22:48
    
I'm using version 11.4.2 – Ben Pearce May 20 '13 at 22:50
    
Changing permissions didn't help – Ben Pearce May 20 '13 at 22:51
    
log in as root, su apache_user -c php daemon.php see what happens – Dagon May 20 '13 at 22:54

Try a different approach.

$file_handler = fopen( 'daemon1tempname.log', 'a+') or die ('Can not work with the File!');

$count = 0;
while(true){
    $count = $count + 1;
    fwrite($file_handler, "Test {$count}\n" );
    sleep(1);  
}
fclose($file_handler);

Notice the different name of the file. Just make sure you work with a new file. If that works, test it with the file you want. If that does not work, then you know it's a permission issue.

share|improve this answer
2  
if you don't close the file you won't see any thing written outside. – Ahmed Masud May 22 '13 at 8:24
    
Thanks for the note! Answer updated. – Hector Ordonez May 22 '13 at 8:31

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