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So basically my problem is within this function while I'm trying to free memory from array q.

int makegrid (float *x, float *y, float squaresize, float map, int npoints)
{

  int score=0, i;

  int m = map/squaresize;
  int nsqr = m*m;
  int *q;
  q = NULL;
  q = (int *) malloc (sizeof(int)*nsqr);    

  for(i=0;i<nsqr;i++)
    q[i] = 0;



  int helper1 = 0;
  int helper2;
  float helperf;

  for(i = 0; i < npoints; i++)
  {
     helperf = x[i] - E;
     helper1 = floor(helperf/squaresize)*(m); 

     helperf = y[i] - E;
     helper2 = floor(helperf/squaresize);

     helper1 += helper2;
     q[helper1]++;

  }

  for(i=0;i<nsqr;i++)
  { 
     if(q[i] >= 1 && q[i] <= 4)
        score--;
     else if (q[i] == 0)
        score++;
     else
        score+=5;
  }

  free(q);
  q = NULL;

  return score; 
}

The function's goal is to create a score for a certain generated grid, map is the size of the whole grid, while squaresize is the size of each square in the grid, npoints is the size of both x and y vectors, and this function is called by a loop that changes the squaresize.

I don't know what's wrong with the free though and I appreciate suggestions (The size of x and y arrays are supposed to be above 5k)

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1  
is there any chance that helper1 out of range in " q[helper1]++; " –  Gavin May 21 '13 at 2:37
    
How do you know it's the call to free() which is causing the problem? –  Paul Griffiths May 21 '13 at 3:10
    
Roughly try q = (int *) malloc (sizeof(int)*(nsqr*2)); instead of q = (int *) malloc (sizeof(int)*nsqr); I think the problem is with buffer overflow. –  akhil May 21 '13 at 4:11

1 Answer 1

free can often fail when you've messed up your memory elsewhere. It doesn't segfault before since the memory is yours, but you've screwed up your memory management data structures, so free accesses outside memory.

It's almost guaranteed to be this line:

 q[helper1]++;

Put an assertion (or a print) before this if helper1 > nsqr

 printf("TOO BIG!  %d > %d\n", helper1, nsqr);
 q[helper1]++;

..or based on the comments, check for negative numbers, too.

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I tried that and it didn't work, it never print this message, and I suspect the problem is on free(q) because I've been printing message between lines until I find out where the program stopped working –  user2403793 May 21 '13 at 5:18
    
It's most likely due to helper1 going negative. The memory management data structures are usually at q[-4]..q[-1] or so. So add a negative check too. –  NovaDenizen May 21 '13 at 5:47
    
Thanks man, I was having some negative numbers, so I will recheck my formula then. –  user2403793 May 21 '13 at 5:55

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