Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on pset6 of Harvard's cs50 now, the problem is to implement a trie dictionary. I finally managed to make it work with a small problem.

  1. When I run valgrind to check memory leak, it tells me that I've freed one more than I've alloced, but I can't see any problem in my unload function.
  2. It also warns me that there are some uninitilized values, but I can't figure it out although it won't affect the result.

here is my entire code:

/****************************************************************************
 * dictionary.c
 *
 * Computer Science 50
 * Problem Set 6
 *
 * valgrink warn that there are uninitilized values, could be the node struct, but don't
 * know how to initialize it, anyway, it works at last!


 * Implements a dictionary's functionality.
 ***************************************************************************/

#include <stdbool.h>

#include <ctype.h>   

#include "dictionary.h"

#include <string.h>

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define HASHTABLE_SIZE 5000



int count = 0;     // gloabal counter

typedef struct node {         // data structure 
    bool end_word;
    struct node *children[27];
    } node;

int
charNumber(char c);   // function prototype

void 
freeNode(node *currentNode);

node root = {false,{NULL}};
/*
 * Returns true if word is in dictionary else false.
 */

bool
check(const char *word)
{
    node *ptr = &root;
    for (int i=0;i<strlen(word);i++)
    {
        if (ptr->children[charNumber(word[i])] == NULL)
            return false;
        ptr = ptr->children[charNumber(word[i])];
    }
    if (ptr->end_word)
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}


/*
 * Loads dictionary into memory.  Returns true if successful else false.
 */

bool
load(const char *dictionary)
{
//    char word[LENGTH+1];  // must initialize to zero! Or there will be some weird problem.
    FILE *fp = fopen(dictionary,"r");
    if (fp == NULL)
        return false;
    while (!feof(fp))
    {
        char word[LENGTH+1] = {};
        fscanf(fp,"%s\n",word); // have to use "%s\n" instead of "%s", or the count will be wrong, don't know why.
        count++;    
        node *ptr = &root;
        for (int i=0;i<strlen(word);i++)
        {
            if (ptr->children[charNumber(word[i])] == NULL)
            {
                node *new = malloc(sizeof(node));   
                *new = (node) {false,{NULL}};       // initiallization
                ptr->children[charNumber(word[i])] = new;
                ptr = new;
            }
            else
            {
                ptr = ptr->children[charNumber(word[i])];
            }
         }
         ptr->end_word = true;
    }
fclose(fp);           
return true;
}


/*
 * caculate a number for the character
 */

int
charNumber(char c)
{
    int num;
    if (c == '\'')
        return 26;
    else if(c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z')
        c += 32;
    num = c - 'a';
    return num;
}



/*
 * Returns number of words in dictionary if loaded else 0 if not yet loaded.
 */

unsigned int
size(void)
{
    if (count)
        return count;
    else
        return 0;
}


/*
 * Unloads dictionary from memory.  Returns true if successful else false.
 */

bool
unload(void)
{
    freeNode(&root);
    return true;         // can't figure out when to return false...
}

void freeNode(node *currentNode)
{
    for (int i=0;i<27;i++)
    {
        if (currentNode->children[i] != NULL)
            freeNode(currentNode->children[i]);
    }
    free(currentNode);
 }

and here is some of the valgrind output

==22110== Invalid free() / delete / delete[]
==22110==    at 0x4024ECD: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:366)
==22110==    by 0x8048F90: freeNode (dictionary_tries.c:152)
==22110==    by 0x8048F45: unload (dictionary_tries.c:141)
==22110==    by 0x8048AB5: main (speller.c:158)
==22110==  Address 0x804a5a0 is 0 bytes inside data symbol "root"
==22110==
--22110-- REDIR: 0x40b2930 (strchrnul) redirected to 0x4028570 (strchrnul)


==22110==
==22110== HEAP SUMMARY:
==22110==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==22110==   total heap usage: 367,083 allocs, 367,084 frees, 41,113,776 bytes allocated
==22110==
==22110== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==22110==
==22110== ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 14 from 9)
==22110==
==22110== 1 errors in context 1 of 1:
==22110== Invalid free() / delete / delete[]
==22110==    at 0x4024ECD: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:366)
==22110==    by 0x8048F90: freeNode (dictionary_tries.c:152)
==22110==    by 0x8048F45: unload (dictionary_tries.c:141)
==22110==    by 0x8048AB5: main (speller.c:158)
==22110==  Address 0x804a5a0 is 0 bytes inside data symbol "root"
==22110==
--22110--
--22110-- used_suppression:     14 U1004-ARM-_dl_relocate_object
==22110==
==22110== ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 14 from 9)
share|improve this question
    
don't use new as variable name. –  taocp May 21 '13 at 3:15
4  
Please don't tag C code with C++; the memory management techniques that are native to the languages are quite different. And in C++, new is a keyword, so your code is strictly, but strictly, C code and nothing to do with C++. –  Jonathan Leffler May 21 '13 at 3:16
    
If valgrind is giving you warnings, then you should include representative examples of those warnings in the question. If valgrind is not giving you precise line numbers, you need to compile the code with debugging enabled (usually -g) so that it can tell you which line numbers are going wrong. Note that malloc() does not initialize the memory; you don't seem to initialize the children part of the structure when you first allocate it, which would lead to problems. –  Jonathan Leffler May 21 '13 at 3:20
1  
In fact, the C tag wiki makes it fairly clear that you shouldn't tag C and C++ together. Aside from that, I hope you're not attempting to freeNode(&root);... –  undefined behaviour May 21 '13 at 3:24
1  
You are trying to free root which you didn't allocate. –  n.m. May 21 '13 at 3:29

2 Answers 2

Suppose your load function opens a blank file. feof(fp) will initially return 0, because a read operation hasn't been used yet; The EOF flag will only be set after a read operation returns a value indicating an error. This is where an error lies. In your case, you need to loop on the return value of fscanf(fp,"%s\n",word); rather than the return value of feof. For example:

while (fscanf(fp, "%s", word) == 1) {
    /* ... */
}

if (feof(fp)) {
    /* The loop ended due to EOF */
}
else if (ferror(fp)) {
    /* The loop ended due to some file input error */
}
else {
    /* The loop ended because the input was invalid
     * (this applies to input where a conversion is
     *  required eg. the conversion in %d, %u, %f, etc... */
}

To elaborate, feof is only for determining why the last read failed!

The reason this would cause such a warning in the case of a blank file is that word would contain indeterminate information.

Additionally, freeNode(&root); is erroneous because free is only to be called on pointers that are returned by calloc, realloc and malloc.

share|improve this answer
node root = {false,{NULL}};

is not allocated on the heap, but then you try to free it like it is

unload(void)
{
    freeNode(&root);
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, root is a global variable and is therefore not likely to be allocated on the stack. You're right that it is not dynamically allocated and therefore should not be freed, though. –  Jonathan Leffler May 21 '13 at 3:50
    
updated.. but where IS it then? –  xaxxon May 21 '13 at 3:52
    
Where-ever the implementation decides to put it. Remember, the stack and the heap are in the same place... –  undefined behaviour May 21 '13 at 4:05
    
@xaxxon - Line 42 (Aint it funny how many questions than number answers!) –  enhzflep May 21 '13 at 4:36
    
@enhzflep not sure if you're being serious or trying to be funny, but I meant where is the memory for the variable allocated. –  xaxxon May 21 '13 at 4:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.