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In recursion, a method calls itself. I'm not following it when there are return values. For example, in the "Learn to Program" book by Chris Pine, there is this example on factorials.

def factorial num 
  if num < 0
    return 'You cant\'t take the factorial of a negative number!'
  end
  if num <= 1
    1
  else 
    num * factorial(num-1)
  end
end 

If I call the method factorial(3), it will go to the else portion of the code and will look like this:

3 * factorial(3-1)

and should return 6 since 3*2=6. factorial(3-1) calls the factorial method passing 2 within the recursion. num = 2, and thus 2 * factorial(2-1) and 2*1=2.

What happens to the 6 that we got from our first run through the code? Now that num = 1, it looks like this will now return 1 and go to the end of the code. But from my understanding, we still have 6 and 2 from the previous recursions. Am I correct in this assumption, since we called the factorial function when we multiplied by num? Can someone help me understand this better? Say we called factorial(10), how would this work out?

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6  
Did you watch Inception ? –  oldergod May 21 '13 at 4:55
3  
All that code... when all you had to do is: def fact(n) (1..n).inject(1) {|r,i| r*i } end :) –  alfasin May 21 '13 at 5:08
    
The factorial function is always used as an example for recursion when it's a terrible way to solve that problem. I think this has inflicted all kinds of brain-damage on beginning programmers, as soon every problem becomes something to be solved with recursion instead of a proper technique like a stack. –  tadman May 21 '13 at 5:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, you should replace your return 'blabla' with a raise 'blabla' because your function returns a numeric, not a string.

Then see it like this

factorial(3)
  3 * factorial(2)
        2 * factorial(1)
              1  # no more recursion, let's go up replacing 
                 # the function calls by the returned value
            end
      end
end
# ↓
factorial(3)
  3 * factorial(2)
        2 * 1  # let's go up again !
      end
end
# ↓
factorial(3)
  3 * 2 # finally
end
# ↓
6
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Now what happens to the 6 that we got from our first run through the code?

There was no 6 from the first run; the 6 only appeared at the end.

This is what happens:

factorial(3) → 3 * factorial(2)
factorial(3) → 3 * 2 * factorial(1)
factorial(3) → 3 * 2 * 1

There is no “memory” of previous calls in your function, each time factorial() is called, it's like a brand new function; is it clearer when written as multiple functions?

def factorialof3
  3 * factorialof2
end

def factorialof2
  2 * factorialof1
end

def factorialof1
  1
end
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Patrice answer splitting it up into separate functions is good, and if you have any background in computer science, it will also help to think of what data structures are probably at work here, mainly the Stack

So when you call factorial(3) it will go to that else block and 'stack' on another call to factorial(2)

and then stack another one with a call to factorial(1).

at that point, since num = 1, (recursion must always have a base case) factorial(1) will return 1.

Then because of the stack, the last one in is the first one out, so the factorial(1) will return 1, and that will 'fall' back down to the factorial(2) call, and because it was called in that else block, the call to factorial(2-1) will now be replaced by 1, and you will get 2*1, and I think by now you get the picture

It is also important to note, this example is trying to teach you recursion in general, and this example is not really idiomatic ruby. The solution alfasin posted as a comment is more like it.

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