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I want to show a compile time error when i call a method.

Like i have a class "MyClass" in which there are two methods "methodA()" and "methodB()". now i make a instance of "MyClass" . using this instance i can call both methods but i need to show an compile time error if i call "methodB()" before "methodA()"; strong text

class MyClasss
{
    public void methodA()
    {
        //do some thing
    }
    public void methodB()
    {
        //do some thing
    }
}
class MyRunningClasss
{
    public static void main(String... args)
    {
        MyClass MC = new MyClass();

        // it will not give any compile time error.
        MC.methodA();
        MC.methodB();

        // but it have to  give compile time error.
        MC.methodB();
        MC.methodA();

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
What's the question ? –  alfasin May 21 '13 at 5:05
    
What are you trying to do? What compilation error are you referring to? –  asgs May 21 '13 at 5:05
1  
Hey dude Whey Cretae Class All method are Loaded into ur Object. you can call any method at any point of time. Whts is ur question.? –  Akshay Joy May 21 '13 at 5:06
5  
You can't do that. If users of your code must know that they must call methodA before calling methodB, use proper JavaDoc and throw an Exception in methodB in case methodA hasn't been called. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 21 '13 at 5:06
1  
You can't do this at compile time. The best you could do is to check a flag and throw an exception after an improper call to methodB –  NovaDenizen May 21 '13 at 5:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you are suggesting isn't easy. You need to download the OpenJDK and change it. It's a very large code base so I don't suggest you that.

Instead I suggest you add a runtime assertion check and unit test your code. If you use maven or ant to run your tests as part of your build, these error will be detect at build time, even if it is your tests, not the compiler which detects the error.

What makes it particularly difficult for the compiler if you can do any number of things which are difficult to determine at compile time.

e.g.

public static somethingA(int n) {
    // do something
    if(n == x)
       MC.methodA();
}

public static somethingB(int n) {
    // do something
    if(n == y)
        MC.methodB();
}

// is this a compile error or not
for(int i=0;i<10;i++) {
    somethingB(i);
    somethingA(i);
}

There is many patterns where such a feature like this would be useful, it is just very hard to solve. e.g. making sure you Lock.unlock() after a Lock.lock(), but you can place these in different methods, or put conditions on them.

share|improve this answer
2  
@vikrant You would also have to give this modified OpenJDK compiler to everyone who uses your code. The maintainability of this is enormously complicated and entirely unnecessary, not to mention you're basically throwing out a desire to stick to the Java language spec. –  ajp15243 May 21 '13 at 5:11
1  
I agree that a compile-time check for this particular case is Turing-complete, but it's definitely not as hard to add additional checks to the JDK as you're implying it is -- OpenJDK's langtools.jar provides an API for the Java compiler that you can add checks to fairly straightforwardly. The error-prone project does a lot of this, and we use it at Google. –  Louis Wasserman May 21 '13 at 16:45

Consider this code:

void callOne(boolean b) {
    if (b) {
        methodA();
    else {
        methodB();
    }
}
void randomTry() {
    int x, y, z;
    x = 1 + Random.nextInt(1000);
    y = 1 + Random.nextInt(1000);
    z = 1 + Random.nextInt(1000);
    boolean b = (x*x*x + y*y*y == z*z*z);
    callone(b);
    callOne(!b);
}

The compiler would have to prove Fermat's last theorem in order to figure out that methodB is always called first.

share|improve this answer
    
Only for x, y and z up to 1000. This can be done by enumeration. It might increase compilation time, though. –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy May 21 '13 at 5:51

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