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I'm creating a vector<vector<char>> from char arrays as follows:

typedef vector<vector<char>> board;
...
char row0[] = {'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X'};
char row1[] = {'-', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', '-'};
char row2[] = {'-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-'};
char row3[] = {'-', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', '-'};
char row4[] = {'-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-'};
char row5[] = {'-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-'};
char row6[] = {'-', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', '-'};
char row7[] = {'-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-'};
char row8[] = {'-', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', '-'};
char row9[] = {'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X'};

vector<char> v0(row0[0], row0[9]);
vector<char> v1(row1[0], row1[9]);
vector<char> v2(row2[0], row2[9]);
vector<char> v3(row3[0], row3[9]);
vector<char> v4(row4[0], row4[9]);
vector<char> v5(row5[0], row5[9]);
vector<char> v6(row6[0], row6[9]);
vector<char> v7(row7[0], row7[9]);
vector<char> v8(row8[0], row8[9]);
vector<char> v9(row9[0], row9[9]);

board test;
test.push_back(v0);
test.push_back(v1);
test.push_back(v2);
test.push_back(v3);
test.push_back(v4);
test.push_back(v5);
test.push_back(v6);
test.push_back(v7);
test.push_back(v8);
test.push_back(v9);

Having done so, I expected to see the printed board looking like the original char arrays. However, it's printing like this:

X X X X X X X X X X
- - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - -
X X X X X X X X X X 

Where am I going wrong?

EDIT: Here's how I'm printing the board:

    void printBoard(Board b){
    for (int r = 0; r <10; r++){
    cout << "\n";
        for (int c = 0; c <10; c++){
        cout <<  b[r][c] << " ";
        }
}
share|improve this question
    
vector<char> v0(row0[0], row0[9]); Why do you expect this line to push all of the elements of row0 into v0? How can it possibly know that the two elements are from an array, since it doesn't even get pointers to them? –  Patashu May 21 '13 at 6:38
    
okay, good question, thanks. 1) what IS it getting to make it print what it's printing. 2) How can I achieve my desired result? –  user2356560 May 21 '13 at 6:40
    
@user2356560 maybe my answer will help you. –  Ivaylo Strandjev May 21 '13 at 6:41
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your indices are wrong. The end iterator is supposed to point to one past the end of the array (and it is supposed to be a pointer, not a value as you have it currently). Using std::begin and std::end will make sure you don't get this wrong.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;

typedef vector<vector<char>> board;

void print_board(const board& b)
{
    for(const auto& inner : b) {
        for(auto c : inner) {
            std::cout << c << " ";
        }
        std::cout << "\n";
    }
}

int main() 
{
    char row0[] = {'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X'};
    char row1[] = {'-', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', '-'};
    char row2[] = {'-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-'};
    char row3[] = {'-', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', '-'};
    char row4[] = {'-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-'};
    char row5[] = {'-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-'};
    char row6[] = {'-', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', '-'};
    char row7[] = {'-', '-', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', '-', '-'};
    char row8[] = {'-', 'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X', '-'};
    char row9[] = {'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X'};

    vector<char> v0(std::begin(row0), std::end(row0));
    vector<char> v1(std::begin(row1), std::end(row1));
    vector<char> v2(std::begin(row2), std::end(row2));
    vector<char> v3(std::begin(row3), std::end(row3));
    vector<char> v4(std::begin(row4), std::end(row4));
    vector<char> v5(std::begin(row5), std::end(row5));
    vector<char> v6(std::begin(row6), std::end(row6));
    vector<char> v7(std::begin(row7), std::end(row7));
    vector<char> v8(std::begin(row8), std::end(row8));
    vector<char> v9(std::begin(row9), std::end(row9));

    board test;
    test.push_back(v0);
    test.push_back(v1);
    test.push_back(v2);
    test.push_back(v3);
    test.push_back(v4);
    test.push_back(v5);
    test.push_back(v6);
    test.push_back(v7);
    test.push_back(v8);
    test.push_back(v9);

    print_board(test);
}

Of course, you could (and should) construct this in place with C++11 using initializer lists - it'll save a lot of boilerplate code.

share|improve this answer
    
worked like a charm :) –  user2356560 May 21 '13 at 6:55
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To initialize a vector from array you should write something like:

vector<char> v0(row0, row0 + 10);

As opposed to what you have done. I am surprised this code even compiles. Probably you should play a bit with compiler options to print more warnings.

share|improve this answer
    
Trying this gives me: Error: No instance of constructor "std::vector<_Ty, _Alloc>::vector[with _Ty=char, _Alloc=std::allocator<char>]=std::allocator<char>]" matches the argument list. argument types are:(char[10[) –  user2356560 May 21 '13 at 6:45
    
@JoachimPileborg just fixed that before you put the comment :) Thanks anyway :) –  Ivaylo Strandjev May 21 '13 at 6:49
1  
Of course it compiles; one of the constructors takes a size_t and a value_t and an allocator. The latter two are optional. –  phresnel May 21 '13 at 6:49
    
@user2356560 the compile error should be somewhere else. The code I propose should compile. –  Ivaylo Strandjev May 21 '13 at 6:49
add comment

There are a few ways to pushing the data into the vectors. The first, and IMHO the best way, is to use the C++11 uniform initialization:

std::vector<char> v0 = {'X', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', '-', 'X'};
// etc.

The second way is also using another C++11 feature: std::begin and std::end:

std::vector<char> v0(std::begin(row0), std::end(row0));

A third way, and the way to handle "iterators" of arrays before C++11 is to use pointers to the array:

std::vector<char> v0(static_cast<char*>(row0), static_cast<char*>(row0 + 10));

Note that I added 10 to the end, this is because the last iterator is actually one beyond the last entry.


By the way, if you have uniform location, you can initialize the board that way too:

board test = { v0, v2, /* etc... */ };
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