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When freeing memory in C and C++, do I only need the memory address or does it require any specific variable?

So if I were to do something such as:

int* test()
{
    int* x = new int(5);
    return x;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int* y = test();

    delete y;

    return 0;
}

Would this cause memory leaks? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
No leaks here. However avoid such code where memory is allocated via a function and deallocd manually. Another developer using the function test without this knowledge is the reason for quite a lot of memory leak issues.. – Laz May 21 '13 at 9:28
up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, there wouldn't be any leaks there, but then again, neither would there be in

int test()
{
    return 5;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int y = test();
    return 0;
}

Avoid dynamic allocation if you can.

share|improve this answer
3  
Avoid dynamic allocation if you can. True. And if you can't avoid it, use smart pointers. – syam May 21 '13 at 6:57
    
Oh no no, silly. I wouldn't actually that willingly throw dynamic allocation around. It was just an example that dictated what I was trying to explain in my question. :D – Lemmons May 21 '13 at 6:58

Your code, as it is, does not leak (as others have already said). However, it requires very little to break and potentially leak:

int* test()
{
    int* x = new int(5);
    return x;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int* y = test();
    int* z = test();
    delete y;
    delete z;
    return 0;
}

This code now potentially leaks because new can throw, and if the second call to new (z=...) throws then the first pointer (y) can never be deleted. Any other function that can throw (not just a second call to new) will pose the same problem.


This is why smart pointers are a must-have: they use RAII and allow you to write exception-safe code, which is the basis of decent C++. This code simply cannot leak:

std::unique_ptr<int> test()
{
    std::unique_ptr<int> x(new int(5));
    return x;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    std::unique_ptr<int> y = test();
    std::unique_ptr<int> z = test();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

A pointer is, as ist name states, just an address pointing to an object on the heap. So what you do works perfectly fine.

See here for a different thread.

share|improve this answer

You just need the memory address to free the allocated space. But make sure you free it accordingly (in C++), i.e., call delete y[] if it was an array, like that...

In C, you just need the base address only and when you call free(), the complete allocated space will be freed. There won't be any memory leaks in your code.

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