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How can I add 'values' dynamically to the CheckListEditor?
But instead of static 'values', I have to get it dynamically from Bclass options attr.

from enthought.traits.api import HasTraits, Instance, Str
from enthought.traits.ui.api import View, Item, CheckListEditor

class Bclass:
    options = ['one', 'two']

class Aclass(HasTraits):
    bclass = Instance(Bclass)
    abc = Str
    view = View(
        Item(name='abc', editor=CheckListEditor(values=['one', 'two']) ),
        style='simple',
        )
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of giving to the CheckListEditor a list of values, you can give it the name of the trait containing the values:

from traits.api import HasTraits, Instance, Str, List
from traitsui.api import View, Item, CheckListEditor

class Bclass(HasTraits):
    options = List(['one', 'two'])

class Aclass(HasTraits):
    bclass = Instance(Bclass)
    abc = Str

    traits_view = View(
        Item(name='abc', editor=CheckListEditor(name='object.bclass.options')),
    )

b = Bclass()
a = Aclass(bclass=b)
a.configure_traits()

In the example, 'object.bclass.options' means: the traits called options which is an attribute of the trait called bclass in the context object, i.e., the namespace of the current object. The context is only necessary when using the name of a trait in another class.

Update following poster's comment:

In a comment, the poster asked what would happen if Bclass is not an HasTraits class, and/or options is a dictionary.

If Bclass is not a HasTraits class, you won't be able to respond to changes in the dictionary content, so I would do this:

from traits.api import HasTraits, Instance, Str
from traitsui.api import View, Item, CheckListEditor

class Bclass(object):
    options = {'one': 1, 'two': 2}

class Aclass(HasTraits):
    bclass = Instance(Bclass)
    abc = Str

    def default_traits_view(self):
        options = self.bclass.options.keys()
        view = View(
            Item(name='abc', editor=CheckListEditor(values=options)),
        )
        return view

The default_traits_view method is called to create the TraitsUI view dynamically.

If Bclass is a HasTraits class, then you can do better:

from traits.api import HasTraits, Instance, Str, Property, Dict
from traitsui.api import View, Item, CheckListEditor

class Bclass(HasTraits):
    options = Dict({'one': 1, 'two': 2})

class Aclass(HasTraits):
    bclass = Instance(Bclass)
    abc = Str

    options = Property(Str, depends_on='bclass.options')
    def _get_options(self):
        return self.bclass.options.keys()

    traits_view = View(
        Item(name='abc', editor=CheckListEditor(name='options')),
    )

In this case, the view is updated whenever the content of the options dictionary changes.

share|improve this answer
    
What would you do if,<br> options = {'one':1, 'two':2} and<br> opions.keys() has to be used with the editor<br> and Bclass may or may not be derived from HasTraits<br> <br><br> In your reply options=['one', 'two'], will work.<br> –  rabin utam May 21 '13 at 16:31
    
I updated the response so that I could use the code blocks. –  pberkes May 22 '13 at 7:46

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