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I'm creating a dict using zip(), how would I do it without zipping or numpy?

def listtodict(list1, list2):
d={}
return dict(zip(list1, list2))  
print listtodict([1,2,3,4,5],['a','b','c','d','e'])
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closed as too localized by BrenBarn, Rikesh, Yannick Blondeau, Jaguar, pilsetnieks May 21 '13 at 17:26

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14  
It's kind of like asking how to drive a nail, but I don't want to use a hammer to do it, even though I have one. I'm not going to explain why I don't want to use the hammer. –  Dietrich Epp May 21 '13 at 7:07
1  
If you're looking for help with your homework you should say so because these answers aren't what I'd use for homework. –  gnibbler May 21 '13 at 7:33
    
Yup, if you want a good answer to this, then you are going to need to explain why you don't want to use zip(). –  Lattyware May 21 '13 at 7:40

12 Answers 12

Just for fun...

def listtodict(list1, list2):
    return dict(max(vars(__builtins__).items())[1](list1, list2))
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3  
Love it. Took me a second to work out why you were using max(), then I remembered the alphabet. ;) –  Lattyware May 21 '13 at 7:42
    
I smell a rat... –  wim May 21 '13 at 8:00
>>> dict(map(None,[1,2,3,4,5],['a','b','c','d','e']))
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd', 5: 'e'}
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haha cheater!!! +1 for being cunning (This doesn't work in Python 3 btw) –  jamylak May 21 '13 at 7:09
    
@jamylak I'll run some timeings now, it'll be interesting to compare how fast each one is –  HennyH May 21 '13 at 7:10
1  
dict(map(lambda *a:a,[1,2,3,4,5],['a','b','c','d','e'])) for Python3 –  gnibbler May 21 '13 at 7:20

This version consumes B

>>> A=[1,2,3,4,5]
>>> B=['a','b','c','d','e']
>>> {k: B.pop(0) for k in A}
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd', 5: 'e'}

This one leaves B intact

>>> A=[1,2,3,4,5]
>>> B=['a','b','c','d','e']
>>> iterb = iter(B)
>>> {k: next(iterb) for k in A}
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd', 5: 'e'}

As a function

def listtodict(list1, list2):
    return {k: list2.pop(0) for k in list1}
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heheh​​​​​​​​​​ –  wim May 21 '13 at 7:24
>>> A=[1,2,3,4,5]
>>> B=['a','b','c','d','e']
>>> {A[i]: B[i] for i in range(len(A))}
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd', 5: 'e'}

Equivalent to:

>>> d = {}
>>> for i in range(len(A)):
        d[A[i]] = B[i]


>>> d
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd', 5: 'e'}
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Just for fun...

>>> import numpy as np
>>> l1 = [0, 1, 2]
>>> l2 = ['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> dict(np.array([l1, l2]).T)
{'1': 'b', '0': 'a', '2': 'c'}
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4  
There are 2 types of people in this world. Those who use numpy for fun and those who don't. –  gnibbler May 21 '13 at 7:27
>>> A=[1,2,3,4,5]
>>> B=['a','b','c','d','e']
>>> dict((lambda f: (lambda x: x(x))(lambda y: f(lambda *args: y(y)(*args))))(lambda f: lambda a, b, i=0: ((a[i], b[i]),) + f(a, b, i+1) if i < len(a) else ())(A, B))
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd', 5: 'e'}
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2  
Why didn't I think of that? –  HennyH May 21 '13 at 7:36
1  
It's just so obvious once you see it. –  Lattyware May 21 '13 at 7:42
1  
I think guido would like this one! –  wim May 21 '13 at 8:40

Don't try this at home...

>>> l1 = [0, 1, 2]
>>> l2 = ['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> list(csv.DictReader(StringIO(','.join(l2)), l1)).pop()
{0: 'a', 1: 'b', 2: 'c'}
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After a bit of experimentation I think I have come up with a most pythonic solution, taking advantage of various strengths in the language such as generator experessions and starch overloading.

>>> from collections import Counter as potato
>>> from operator import or_ as _and
>>> l1 = [0, 1, 2]
>>> l1, l2 = [0, 1, 2], ['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> l = l1 + l2[::-1]
>>> dict(reduce(_and, (potato({l.pop(0): l.pop()}) for i in l1 if l), potato()))
{0: 'a', 1: 'b', 2: 'c'}
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>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> A=[1,2,3,4,5]
>>> B=['a','b','c','d','e']
>>> d=defaultdict(B.pop)
>>> itemgetter(*reversed(A))(d)
('e', 'd', 'c', 'b', 'a')
>>> dict(d)
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd', 5: 'e'}
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I guess the least horrific way to do it would be:

>>> keys = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> values = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e"]
>>> values_iter = iter(values)
>>> d = {}
>>> for key in keys:
...     d[key] = next(values_iter)
... 
>>> d
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd', 5: 'e'}
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>>> A=[1,2,3,4,5]
>>> B=['a','b','c','d','e']
>>> d={}
>>> [d.setdefault(a, B.pop()) for a in reversed(A)]
['e', 'd', 'c', 'b', 'a']
>>> d
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd', 5: 'e'}
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def listtodict(list1, list2):
    d = {}
    while list1:
        d[list1.pop()] = list2.pop()
    return d
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