Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a piece of C code which I am trying to optimise which involves setting an array a to b. I am currently using memcpy to achieve this, and it works, however it's not fast enough. I.e.

double a[4] = {1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0};
double b[4];
memcpy(b, a, sizeof(a));

This is a basic example, my program is similar but uses up to 9000 doubles. I know that the use of pointers can save a lot of time, but I'm not sure how to do it. You're help is greatly appreciated.

EDIT: I don't need to keep the a array, that can be discarded. I just need to transfer from a to b.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by dbaupp, unkulunkulu, Nicholas Wilson, Stony, Pete May 22 '13 at 7:56

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
If you're copying the data, you're copying the data. I'd be surprised if it were easy to beat memcpy at that. –  Daniel Fischer May 21 '13 at 8:27
    
array object are evaluated like pointers in the memcpy function. Using pointers in memcpy will not make difference –  MOHAMED May 21 '13 at 8:28
3  
You should look at your design to see if all that copying is strictly necessary in the first place. –  Paul R May 21 '13 at 8:29
1  
possible duplicate of Very fast memcpy for image processing? –  dbaupp May 21 '13 at 8:31
3  
If a isn't required after the copy, but you need to transfer from a to b, why not use a instead of b? –  jogojapan May 21 '13 at 8:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I use the values in b to determine new values for a. It goes through a while loop checking for a convergence in data.

In that case you may be able to avoid any copying, if you switch the arrays back and forth, something like this (which is backwards from what you wrote; adjust as needed):

double array1[SIZE], array2[SIZE];
double* a = array1, double* b = array2;
generate_initial_values(array1);

for (;;)
{
    // do either 
    memcpy(b, a, sizeof array1); // sizeof either array will do; *don't* use sizeof a or b, which is only the size of the pointer, not of the array
    update_values_in_b(b);

    // or, better:
    produce_modified_values_in_b_from_a(a, b);

    if (converged(a, b)) break;
    // switch arrays
    double* temp_ptr = a;
    a = b;
    b = temp_ptr;
}

Doing it the second way will be faster if that works for you. If you must memcpy, you can try the stuff in Very fast memcpy for image processing?, but probably the best for you is to use memcpy and set the compiler's optimization level as high as possible. Be sure that you #include <string.h> and that the size argument to memcpy is a compile-time constant (it is above), and look at the generated assembly code to verify that the compiler is inlining the copy.

Edit: Wait, here's another thought, that doesn't even require switching arrays:

double a[SIZE], b[SIZE];
generate_initial_values(a);

for (;;)
{
    produce_modified_values_in_second_array_from_first(a, b);
    if (converged(a, b)) break;
    produce_modified_values_in_second_array_from_first(b, a);
    if (converged(b, a)) break;
}

When you exit the loop you don't know which array has the latest values, but if they've converged you probably don't care. if you do, you can set a pointer to the latest values, or use a function:

void calling_function(void)
{
    ...
    double a[SIZE], b[SIZE];
    generate_initial_values(a);
    double* great_values = get_great_values(a, b); // returns either a or b
    ...
}

double* get_great_values(double* a1, double* a2)
{
    for (;;)
    {
        produce_modified_values_in_second_array_from_first(a1, a2);
        if (converged(a1, a2)) return a2;
        produce_modified_values_in_second_array_from_first(a2, a1);
        if (converged(a2, a1)) return a1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey Jim, thanks, this is what I was looking for. Sorry I didn't explain it in full to begin with :) –  Nicholas Cooke May 21 '13 at 9:13
    
@NicholasCooke I've made it even better ... you may not need any memcpy at all ... take a look. –  Jim Balter May 21 '13 at 9:21
    
Yeah that's perfect! Thanks! –  Nicholas Cooke May 21 '13 at 9:39
    
@NicholasCooke Take another look ... I've improved on perfection, I think. –  Jim Balter May 21 '13 at 9:52
    
BTW, this is a classic example of an XY problem (google it). The problem wasn't really about either memcpy or pointers. –  Jim Balter May 21 '13 at 9:58

If memcpy() does not work, you are stuck. The memcpy() function, for large operands, is memory-bound so it is impossible* to beat it. The only option is to redesign your program so it does not need to copy the arrays.

("Memory-bound" means that memcpy() is limited by the speed of your RAM or memory controller. Functions can be CPU-bound, memory-bound, IO-bound, etc.)

On most platforms, memcpy() is written in hand-tuned assembly language and heavily optimized to take advantage of various processor features (such as SSE). Trying to use multiple cores will not work because even if you spread the work across more cores, you are not spreading the work across more RAM or more memory controllers.

Footnotes

* Some platforms or toolchains may have a poorly-optimized memcpy().

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.