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This snippet:

names<-c("Alice","Bob","Charlie")
ages<-c(25,24,25)
friends<-data.frame(names,ages)
a25 <- friends[friends$age==25,]
a25
table(a25$names)

gives me this output

    names ages
1   Alice   25
3 Charlie   25

  Alice     Bob Charlie 
      1       0       1

Now, why "Bob" is in the output since the data frame a25 does not include "Bob"? I would expected an output like this (from the table command):

  Alice  Charlie 
      1        1 

What am I missing?

My environment:

R version 2.15.2 (2012-10-26)
Platform: i386-w64-mingw32/i386 (32-bit)
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2  
Your names variable has been converted to a factor. And table shows the counts of every level of your factor, even if they have 0 count. –  juba May 21 '13 at 8:33
    
@juba Thanks, and so when I create the a25 variable, does it "inherit" the factor with three levels? –  Alessandro Jacopson May 21 '13 at 8:41
1  
a25 is not a variable, it is a data frame which is a subset of friends. So it inherits the age factor from friends with all its levels, yes. –  juba May 21 '13 at 8:45
    
@juba OK, I understand. Is it possible to get result I was expecting? –  Alessandro Jacopson May 21 '13 at 11:32
1  
You can try a25$age <- factor(a25$age). Or keep your variable as character with stringsAsFactors=FALSE in data.frame. –  juba May 21 '13 at 11:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This question appears to have an answer in the comments. This answer shares one additional approach and consolidates the suggestions from the comments.

The problem you describe is as follows: There is no "Bob" in your "a25$names" variable, but when you use table, "Bob" shows up. This is because the levels present in the original column have been retained.

table(a25$names)
# 
#   Alice     Bob Charlie 
#       1       0       1 

Fortunately, there's a function called droplevels that takes care of situations like this:

table(droplevels(a25$names))
# 
#   Alice Charlie 
#       1       1 

The droplevels function can work on a data.frame too, allowing you to do the following:

a25alt <- droplevels(friends[friends$ages==25,])
a25alt
#     names ages
# 1   Alice   25
# 3 Charlie   25
table(a25alt$names)
# 
#   Alice Charlie 
#       1       1 

As mentioned in the comments, also look at as.character and factor:

table(as.character(a25$names))
table(factor(a25$names))
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