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I want to extend the java.util.Calendar class in order to add some extra functionality:

import java.util.Calendar;
abstract class ExtendedCalendar extends Calendar {
    public static ExtendedCalendar getInstance()
    {
        Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
        return (ExtendedCalendar)c;
    }
}

I always get this exception, because Calendar.getInstance returns an GregorianCalendar:

java.lang.ClassCastException: java.util.GregorianCalendar cannot be cast to ExtendedCalendar

But how is it possible that a Cast of GregorianCalendar to Calendar is working?

Calendar calendar = (Calendar)c;

How can I solve that problem?

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You could extend GregorianCalendar instead. Or provide a static utility class ccontaining the extra methods. –  assylias May 21 '13 at 8:50

4 Answers 4

Calendar.getInstance() is a static factory method that event does not allow any customizations or injections. It returns instance of concrete calendar. In most cases it is GregorianCalendar. It can be also BuddhistCalendar or JapaneseImperialCalendar depending on your locale.

If you want to create instance of your calendar just do it by direct call of your constructor: new ExtendedCalendar().

BTW IMHO you do not really have to extend GregorianCalendar. Extending functionality is not limited to extending class. Create your own class that uses other calendar in its calculations instead of extending it.

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This is how polymorphism works. Both GregorianCalendar and ExtendedCalendar are subclasses of Calendar. That means that both of them are also of type Calendar. However, a GregorianCalendar is not of type ExtendedCalendar

You can try to extend the GregorianCalendar if it is possible. Otherwise, you cannot cast from a subclass of Calendar to another subclass of Calendar

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This should help you Extending Calendar in Java .Its a crime to extend calendar class which is already been ignored by many experts

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The reason is that Calendar is an abstract class and GergorianCalendar is the current implementation of it.

So, I think your ExtendedCalendar class shouldn't be abstract.

You can extend Calendar with a normal class and add your functions. You will just need then to define your own attributes and methods. What you did is a good beginning. You can also extend GregorianCalendar.

And you will have access to both the method of the implemented interface and your own.

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Ah okay, so what is the best approach to extend the Calendar with some extra functionality? –  freakout May 21 '13 at 8:47
    
Well, I think so. –  Xaltar May 24 '13 at 12:00

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